Tag: painting

TPT Cyber Monday Sale-25% off

It’s Cyber Monday on TPT and my shop blog which means it’s my absolute favorite time of year. The dropping temperatures, cozy fires, holiday shopping, smell of Christmas trees, and way too much eggnog gives me all the feels.

This time of year is also notoriously busy as I try to wrap up my semester long classes and finish up end of the semester projects in my yearlong classes. I am hopeful my students can cut up and display the me-sized laminated section of supply labels in the picture above before the year comes to a close (read more about these below). As a yearbook adviser our second deadline is on the horizon, which means I will soon be cross eyed with editing once again. As a wife and mom I have a lot of prepping to do as Christmas very quickly approaches.

Although life is busy as usual I had to take a minute to throw up a quick blog post to let you know about the cyber Monday sale that starts tomorrow, 12/2 and runs through the end of the day Tuesday, 12/3.

Although the school year has gone into full swing and my life outside of the classroom is always a hustle, I have been working hard on my TPT products. I have a bunch of new projects, bundles, and printable displays to share with you guys. Don’t forget to spoil yourself with a few TPT items this holiday season!

PINHOLE PHOTOGRAPHY

Pinhole photography has been a big theme in a number of my recent projects. I collaborated with my retired art teacher mom, Anne Ward, on a basic pinhole photography pack and an elementary through high school pack with everything you need to set up and teach pinhole.

My mom never ceased to amaze me growing up with her ideas and fearlessness for trying new things in her classroom. I remember when she began exploring pinhole photography in her classes, converting a storage closet into a temporary darkroom every spring. She ended up bringing her pinhole knowledge home over the summers by teaching classes to neighborhood kids and converting a bathroom and my Dad’s workshop into a darkroom.

I remember helping her out during summers in college. Teaching these classes helped us raise money to go on a trip to Italy and France, time that was so precious to spend one on one with my mom. Although she has retired from the classroom my mom continues to teach pinhole to neighborhood kids every summer. I was so excited to work on these packs with her so I could share her years of knowledge with you.

This basic pinhole pack gives you instructions on setting up a darkroom, building a camera, contact printer, and getting started taking and developing pictures.

This pinhole pack has everything mentioned above as well as lesson plans, worksheets, and additional projects for students to work on in elementary to high school. The lesson plan includes specifics on how to adapt everything to each grade level. You will have everything you need to get started with pinhole in your classroom.

In addition to working with my mom on pinhole I also picked the brain of my photography teacher coworker on how she implements pinhole photography in her class. I combined the resources created with my mom with Meagan’s project ideas to create a pack specific to upper middle school and high school age students.

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Digital photography products have been a major theme in my TPT shop over the last year. I had the chance to work with my photographer teacher coworker, Meagan Brooker, to share her amazing lessons and resources with you. Every year her students are recognized in multiple contests for their outstanding photography. Now you have the chance to use her ideas and implement them in your classes.

If you are looking to incorporate traditional photography techniques into your class, but don’t have a darkroom set up, give cyanotypes a try. Use digitally captured and printed images to create fine art blueprints using this classic technique.

This light focused bundle pack includes two projects that cover seven different lighting techniques. From light box still lifes to light painting to using found lighting outside the classroom, this pushes students to think creatively about how they use lights to enhance their photographs.

DSLR photography selfies project

Selfies are an undeniable aspect of current photography trends. Take back the reigns of social media photography and teach students how to create artistic selfies. How can you create a selfie using a DSLR camera? Require the students to take a picture of themselves using self timers, conceptual selfies, and more. Students select three out of four topics to explore, all focused on reflecting themselves.

Start introducing Photoshop basics with this fun “magic” themed photo project, invisibility illusion. Students are tasked with combining multiple images together and cutting sections out to create the illusion of a section disappearing.

A DSLR photography lesson on making ugly subject beautiful.

My latest addition to my TPT store is my making the ugly beautiful DSLR project. Students have to take two photographs that reflect two different topics: ugly subject, beautiful composition and glorifying the everyday. Link coming for this assignment tonight, in the meantime check out my TPT store and be on the lookout for this new addition.

SUPPLY LABELS

Colorful clay themed printable supply labels.

I finally took the time to add to my art pack of supply labels and create a stand alone set for all things clay. Clay supplies are their own special category and they are hopefully included in every art classroom. These are rainbow themed, easy to print, and easy to read. Two different styles are included.

Chalkboard themed printable clay supply labels

In addition to my rainbow themed clay supply labels, I also included chalkboard themed ones. Every classroom style is different, hopefully one of these will compliment your style and help your students find supplies independently. These are also included in my bundle pack of chalkboard supply labels for visual art supplies.

ART CURRICULUMS

It was a huge check on my to do list to A: Update my current AP art curriculums to the new standards and to B: add a 3D Design section to my curriculum. You can purchase this as a stand alone curriculum if you only teach 3D Design or you can purchase it as part of my AP studio art bundle if you teach all three. This is fully updated to reflect the switch to sustained investigation and selected works. Although I have never taught AP 3D, I did take it as a student (back in the day) and I work closely with two teachers who teach it at my current school.

I also finally got around to bundling all of my painting curriculums into one mega bundle. This includes my Introduction to Painting, Painting I, Painting II, and Advanced Painting. The painting I and II curriculums can be found here and here. The Introduction to Painting curriculum is separated out from my yearlong Intro to Art curriculum and the Advanced Painting is separated out from my yearlong Advanced Art curriculum.

After a quick getaway to Hilton Head Island for Thanksgiving I am back in the swing of things preparing for the holidays and the end of the semester at school. Treat yourself to the gift of time by purchasing one of my products and saving yourself all the planning that goes into lesson prep.

Thanks for taking the time to check out this post! If you want to read more summaries of products check out past sales updates here, here, and here. Help me spread the word about amazing art resources by sharing this with others. Don’t forget to follow me on TPT to get updated on new products and instagram for an inside look at my day to day classroom activities. Also check out my blog shop for 30% off all products that are included. Thanks for stopping by!

Visual Journal Page 41: Already on Edge

I was already on edge.

I had woken up early, showered, carefully selected my most professional outfit. I was driving on 285 en route to an interview.

It wasn’t just any interview. It was an interview at a well regarded private school that happened to be across the street from where my husband worked, we could carpool. I would have an actual budget to teach art. I would have small class sizes. I would work in a building dedicated to the fine arts. I could move on from my current job where I felt worn out, unappreciated, overworked, and like I was only a warm body available to proctor standardized test after standardized test.

A lot was weighing on this moment. I had to crush it. I couldn’t stay in my current job another year. Something needed to change.

All of these thoughts circled my head when suddenly taillights flashed ahead; the sound of crunching, and squealing tires followed. I glanced quickly to my right and miraculously in that split second the lane was open, I jumped over just in time. I had just missed being another car in a string of crushed metal.

A few seconds earlier or later and I could’ve been stuck on 285 while my interviewees awaited my arrival. I felt a wave of relief followed by the anxiety of almost being in an accident.

I was already on edge.

By the time I reached my interview my nerves had calmed, I had collected my thoughts, I was ready. I walked onto the school’s campus and was overwhelmed by how beautiful it was. I sat through five different interviews, and while intimidating, they were all so welcoming and nice. It felt like a place I could belong.

Seven years later that 285 corridor has become my commute. Hopefully I will continue to avoid accidents on my way to my beautiful campus and cushy private school job.

Supplies:

  • Visual journal,
  • Rubber cement or Mod Podge
  • Scissors
  • Watercolor
  • White paper
  • Book pages
  • Thin sharpie

How To:

To create this visual journal page I wanted to recreate the scene of the accident. As I drove past and glanced to my left I saw at least three cars had rear ended each other, but quite a few were stopped. I decided to stick with that number, after all odds are more pleasing in art.

I sketched out the crunched up cars on a separate sheet of paper and filled them in with watercolor. While the watercolor was still wet I blew it where the cars made contact to create a splatter effect. Once the first layer of watercolor dried, I add more detail and some shadows and highlights. I cut it out once it was dry.

Next, I cut out triangle shapes from two different colors of book pages. I wanted to create a graphic, loud symbol that would somewhat blend into the background. I glued the smaller triangles on top of the a larger triangles, then carefully placed them in the book. Once I was satisfied with their placement, emphasizing the cars hitting each other, I glued them down.

The watercolor cars were added next, then a few more book page triangles to the bottom. Last but not least I added the text using a thin sharpie.

Challenge:

Create a visual journal page about a stressful moment in your life. Incorporate cut up book pages somewhere in your image.

Check out more of my visual journal pages here. Interested in teaching visual journals? Check out my TPT lesson here.

Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog! Help me spread the word about visual journals with others. Thanks for stopping by.

Fall Decoration: Painted Pumpkins Tutorial

A tutorial on how to artistically paint pumpkins.

After drooling over Alisa Burke’s pumpkins this season I decided it was time to make my own. I thought it would be a fun Saturday morning activity with my little man, but it ended up inspiring a lesson plan.

I wanted to test a range of supplies so I could troubleshoot any issues that could come up before my students jumped in. I ended up getting:

  • Mini pumpkins
  • Acrylic paint, a range of colors
  • A range of paint pen colors
  • Metallic paint pens
  • Black paint pens (these work much better than Sharpies)
  • White paint pens
  • Glow in the dark puff paint
  • Paint brushes

I started the process by spreading out all of the supplies and letting my little man play.

I first fell in love with Alisa Burke’s white lace on black pumpkin design, so that was the first one that I tackled. 

I started by painting my entire pumpkin with black acrylic paint, including the stem. Once it dried, which took overnight, I doodled on top with a white paint pen. It was easy and had a ton of impact.

The next pumpkin I did was a white, black, and metallic design. I started by painting the entire pumpkin white, then adding the geometric design with black paint pens and deatils with metallic and white paint pens. I struggled with this design before finally settling on a more symmetrical, mandala-esk design. The original more polka dot themed design was covered up with the big black triangle shapes.

The final pumpkin I created was my acrylic paint pour one, which turned out to be my favorite. I started by doodling about halfway up the pumpkin, starting at the bottom. I wanted it to look like the paint was covering a design. I then poured thinned down acrylic paint (use just a little bit of water) on top until it dripped down the sides. I started with white as a base, then alternated colors. For this design I used hot pink, teal, green, and white. For this to be successful I believe white is key. It helps to have a neutral that mixes well with any color. The white helps the colors pop against each other.

Once I finished the pour I let my pumpkin dry overnight. I then outlined the drips and finished the doodles where it was needed with a black paint pen.

I am so happy with how these little babies turned out. I plan to  keep them on my front porch through Thanksgiving, or until they rot. I surprised two of my classes with the project and they are having so much fun! If you are interested in the lesson plan, stay tuned, it will be hitting TPT in the next 24 hours. I planned two days for the project, one for paint, one for paint pen decorating.

Have a wonderful holiday season and don’t forget to add a little art into it. Even Captain America does it.

Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog! Interested in pushing your artistic pumpkin making even further? Check out my artist inspired relief pumpkin project here. Interested in other weekend crafts? Check out my craft posts here. Don’t forget to follow me on Instagram, Facebook, and other social media outlets, links to the right!

Gelli Printmaking Crash Course From a Self Taught Printmaker

This year I taught myself how to create gelli prints a few days before I started teaching it to students. I had been interested in trying it for a couple of years, especially after seeing a demo of it at the New York NAEA conference in 2017. When it came time to plan a quick, easy, and pretty looking project for an annual art fundraiser my school participates in, it all clicked in place.

This process is so easy, fast, and fun! It creates beautiful results with little risk. It’s perfect for a fundraiser project because generally every student will create a successful print. After playing around with the process I decided I wanted to take it a step further and incorporate this process into my intro to watercolor assignment.

But let’s start back at the beginning with a little how to.

Gelli printmaking supplies

For this project you need a gelli plate. I had enough plates to pair up my students, but it helps to have at least a few to pass around. Don’t cheap out! I tried buying two more at the last minute at an arts and crafts store. It was easily half the thickness and the paint didn’t transfer as solidly from the plate. I highly recommend the Gelli Arts brand. I especially loved the round print shape.

You will also need…

  • High flow acrylic paint (or the cheap craft store paints or slightly watered down acrylic paint. Open acrylics work really well because they are slow drying)
  • A brayer
  • A barren (or a wood spoon or flat object)
  • Thin watercolor paper (if incorporating the watercolor portion of the project), drawing paper works fine if not doing the watercolor addition
  • Printer paper
  • Leaves and other natural materials
  • Stencils and texture plates to add additional texture as you print.

For the watercolor portion:

  • Watercolor paints
  • Paint brushes
  • Rubbing alcohol in a spray bottle
  • Salt
  • Waterproof pen, or thin Sharpie
  • Masking fluid

HOW TO:

Leaves and pinecones you can use to print with in gelli printmaking.

STEP ONE: Collect materials to print with. You can press textures, such as pine cones, into the plate and place flat objects on the plate to print with to create negative space. Look for leaves with interesting shapes. Large, simple shapes won’t print well. Think little leaves, ferns, interesting contour lines.

The natural objects don’t last well overnight. You may end up needing to collect new natural materials before every class. You can try pressing the leaves between flat, heavy objects to keep them from curling as they dry.

STEP TWO: Set up your station with your paint colors, paper, texture plates, and natural objects. You will need a sheet of paper for the first print and a sheet of printer paper for the ghost print. A ghost print is a print taken after most of the paint has transferred during the first print. The ghost print helps clean up the plate for the next print, no need to rinse these off in between, and it creates a beautiful second image that can be displayed or used in collages, visual journals, etc.

A gelli plate with acrylic paint rolled on top.

STEP THREE: Apply the paint. Put 3-4 dime size dabs of paint on the plate. Try to keep similar colors together, don’t scatter random colors all over the plate or you will get a messier look. Consider color theory, what colors work well together? What happens if the colors you selected mix? Remember, complementary colors (yellow/purple, red/green, and blue/orange) create grays and browns when mixed. Roll over the paint with the brayer, roll over the plate until the entire plate is covered. If you see paint “peaks” where the brayer leaves texture behind, you might have too much paint on your plate. The above plate is a little heavy with paint.

TIP: Place one color on one side of the plate, another on the other side, and roll the brayer up and down until the colors start to mix in the center.

How to press a textured plate into a gelli plate.

STEP FOUR: If applying a texture through a stencil, stamp, pine cone, or similar, do that before placing your leaves. Press your texture object into the plate, then lift it off. Paint should pull up with the object, leaving signs of the texture on the plate.

Gelli prints with brushstrokes.

You can also add paintbrush texture by adding a few drops of paint onto the already rolled plate and spreading it out using a paintbrush. This texture will also transfer to the plate.

See how to print with leaves using a gelli plate.

STEP FIVE: Place your leaves on the wet plate. Don’t move them once you place them, otherwise you may create unwanted lines and texture.

TIP: Try to move through these steps as quick as possible, unless you are using slow drying paint the paint may start to dry on the plate.

STEP SIX: Lay your printing paper on top, press the leaves down with your hand before rubbing over the back with the brayer. Make sure you move over the entire plate with the brayer, ensuring all the paint is being pressed to the paper.

STEP SEVEN: Lift the paper and enjoy your print! Set it aside to dry.

Gelli print and ghost print.

STEP EIGHT: Remove the leaves and place a sheet of printer paper onto the plate. Rub over the back with your hands or a brayer, lift the paper, and enjoy your ghost print! This step also cleans the plate. After this the plate is ready to be reused right away.

TIP: The above ghost print shows the correct amount of paint was used because the majority of the paint stuck to the first sheet of paper, leaving only the paint blocked by the pine needles and leaves behind for the ghost print. If your students have messy prints and a lot of paint left on the plate after printing, have them cut the amount of paint by half the next time around.

If you aren’t adding any watercolor to your print you are done at this point! Cut the extra paper off to center the print in the paper, try to leave a border for display. Mount the prints and display them. OPTIONAL: Display the prints with the ghost prints.

Gelli print supplies to add watercolor.

STEP NINE: Add watercolor to the negative space of the print. For this assignment, I had my student print until they got three successful prints. They selected two to test out 12 watercolor techniques and selected one to leave as is.

I have a watercolor handout and an instruction sheet that I give to my students to reference as they work. Both of these are included in my gelli print lesson plan. This lesson is now serving as my introduction to watercolor before moving into a more in-depth watercolor assignment.

Gelli print with watercolor.

This example shows the wet watercolor painting to the left and the painting after it dried with ink added. The ink helped define the fern and add texture.

Gelli prints

Display the three gelli prints together. Cut the excess paper off, mount them, and enjoy!

How ghost prints and gelli prints can be collaged into a visual journal.

If you have sketchbooks or visual journals in your class, encourage your students to save mess up prints and ghost prints to collage with in their journals. I will blog about collaging my ghost prints in the near future!

Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog! Help me spread the word about art lessons, printmaking, gelli prints, and visual journaling by sharing with others.Interested in more visual journal stories, tips, and how tos? Check out my visual journal blog page here and my visual journal bundle on TPT here. Interested in other printmaking lessons? Check out a relief printmaking blog post here and my printmaking lessons here. Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog! Help spread the word and get involved with visual journaling by following, sharing, and commenting!

I’ve been sharing a lot of my day to day activities, student work, and art and yearbook lessons on my Instagram. Follow along here!

Visual Journal Page 37: Foggy Mornings

Looking at this visual journal page immediately takes me back to my commute to my first job.

My first art position was at a high school outside of Atlanta. I drove 40 minutes straight east everyday until I hit the small town where I worked. It was a very boring drive, straight highway lined with trees. But many mornings in the fall and spring brought beautiful fog that rolled through the trees, making me forget that I was speeding along a highway.

I loved seeing it, and it brought a odd combination of comfort and eeriness watching the white, translucent fog moving through the silhouetted trees. It brought be a sense of calm before I started my crazy, jam-packed day.

SUPPLIES:

  • Visual journal
  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • White paper
  • Book pages
  • Newspaper
  • Watercolor
  • Paint brush
  • India ink
  • Gesso
  • Water
  • Sharpie

HOW TO:

To create this visual journal page, I worked in sections. I first started in my book by gluing down ripped up strips of newspaper and book pages. I then painted the background using warm colors to mimic the look of a sunrise.

While waiting for the background to dry, I used India ink to paint treetop silhouettes on a separate sheet of white paper. I using heavier paper, because India ink can easily saturate printer paper and cause it to ripple and tear. I set that aside and waited for it to dry. TIP: Use a hair dryer to speed up the process!

Once the tree tops were dry, I used watered down gesso to loosely paint fog. I painted the gesso in spirals, circles, and waves to try to mimic the look.

Once the fog and trees dried, I cut them out using scissors. When collaging, I like the look of leaving an edge around objects I cut out. I think it emphasizes the fact that it’s a collage. Once the trees were cut out, I cut them down to fit in the book before gluing them in. TIP: Use a credit card to push pieces into the crease of the book.

When everything was finally put together I added the finishing touches using a thin Sharpie, text that said: “There is something eerie, yet comforting about a foggy morning.”

CHALLENGE:

Recreate a moment when you were in the car. It can be a commute, road trip, or similar! Have fun and good luck!

 

Interested in more visual journal stories, tips, and how tos? Check out my visual journal blog page here and my visual journal bundle on TPT here. Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog! Help spread the word and get involved with visual journaling by following, sharing, and commenting!