Tag: teaching

Visual Journal Page 24: They Are Finally Complete

This visual journal page is one of many that focuses on my furniture. As I have said many times in the past, I believe all furniture has a personality. I carefully select the pieces I include in my house, and I will wait until I find the perfect piece before I purchase something.

This requirement to find something unique, special, and that speaks to me is the reason our beautiful, blue, Crate & Barrel chairs sat awkwardly in the corner of our kitchen for months. I had a vision of a black, round table to finish our breakfast nook space in our kitchen. I searched and searched, but I couldn’t find exactly what I was looking for.

One day, after exhausting the many antique stores around me, I decided to try a new one I had heard good things about. However, the store was on the other side of the city from me, in Marietta, GA. To top it off Nick happened to be out of town that weekend, and with me in my Mini Cooper if I wanted to purchase a table I would have to commit to driving his truck, which terrified me.

Enough was enough, it was time to complete our kitchen. I climbed into his truck, and headed to the downtown connector to make my way to find a table.

I survived the drive, despite feeling like I was driving a bus after being used to the mini size car I drove on a daily basis. I walked into the store full of confidence, did a quick walk around, and didn’t see my black, round table. I decided I need to do one more loop, and look more carefully under the piles of items on display.

Suddenly, I saw it. It was not black, but it was round, white, and had some beautiful detail in the legs. It was the perfect size, and the white was better than the black would’ve ever been. I immediately purchased it, loaded it into the truck, and made my way home.

I survived the way back, but realized once I pulled into the driveway that Nick was out of town. I couldn’t leave a wooden table in the bed of the truck for the weekend. Now I had to figure out how to get it into the house, me vs. the table.

It took some serious muscles, and some serious breaks, to get it to my front door. While balancing the table on it’s side, on our tiny porch, I managed to open the door, keep our two dogs in, while I angled and reangled until I found a way to slide it into our living room.

I collapsed on the floor out of breath, took a moment, and moved it into our nook. It was perfect. Our kitchen was complete.

This blog post is the end of the story to this blog post. I also made a point to visually tie the two visual journal pages together. See below for more details about how this page was made.

SUPPLIES

  • Visual journal
  • Xacto knife
  • Packaging tape
  • Laser printed image
  • Old book page
  • Colored pencil
  • Glue

HOW TO

To create this visual journal page I took advantage of an odd page in my book and inspiration from the first blue chairs page I made.

A few pages in my visual journal book weren’t cut correctly. The paper was connected on the edge, rather than being cut, which created a loop. I already experienced this odd oversight in this visual journal page, and now I had run across it again.

I decided to once again take advantage of it. Rather than remove the page, or slice the edge, I used an Xacto knife to cut a rectangle out of the left side page. This created a space on the page it was connected to, it was a unique way to highlight my image.

I used inspiration from my blue chairs page to create the background strip, which reflected my kitchen. I cut a strip of paper from an old book, then used colored pencil to add details, as if I were looking into my kitchen. I glued it inside the space I just created, then continued it on the right page. The right page offered a great space to write text, I used colored pencil for this.

To create a sense of unity and visually tie to my other chair page, I opted to also draw the table and chairs using colored pencil. I drew each piece on a separate sheet of paper, then cut them out, collaged them, and glued them down using rubber cement.

Since I had this rectangle cut out of the book page, overlapping another page, I decided to turn it into a picture frame. I printed a black and white image of a picture frame, the exact size of the space I wanted to frame, on a laser printer. I then placed packaging tape sticky side down on the front of the printed frame image. I cut the frame out, then ran it under water until the paper started to peel away. I continued to rub the paper off until all that was left was the printer ink stuck to the tape. All the white areas of the image were now transparent, since the white washed off with the paper.

I taped the tape transfer down, and my page was complete.

CHALLENGE

Create a visual journal page about something you recently completed. It could be a personal project, a work assignment, or a carton of ice cream.

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Combining Drawing and Technology into GIFs

Over the summer, one of my goals for my Teachers Pay Teachers store was to add an animated element to the quote section at the top of my site. It was years before I realized other, much fancier, TPT sellers had this element, and mine was a simple gray box with a quote. When you go into the TPT edit mode, the only option is to add a quote, there are no color, font, or image change options. Despite this, somehow someone found a work around. When I finally realized I could do this, and a tutorial existed to teach me how, I tried to make it a top priority.

With the craziness that is life, it still took me months to finally get around to it. The task was a bit daunting, I had never made a GIF before, and I didn’t know where to start. When I finally got around to reading through the tutorial (check out two great resources here and here) I realized how simple it was. I began brainstorming ideas, and quickly settled on emphasizing the little bee that has become a part of my brand.

I drew out the bee, scanned it in, and uploaded it to Photoshop. Using Photoshop, I added each sequence, and saved it as a PNG file. Once I had all the PNG files ready, I uploaded them to a GIF maker and downloaded my compiled GIF. While it took me awhile to figure out the best way to save my files, and it took three times to edit, re-upload, find an error, and edit again, the process was actually fairly easy.

It was extremely satisfying to add it to my TPT store, hit that refresh button, and see my page come to life. I was so impressed with the process, I decided to make GIF headers for my class pages as well.

First, I created one for my painting class. I wanted it to reflect the main purpose of the course, so I used a pencil, paintbrush, palette, and paint to illustrate the header. Again, I used Photoshop to compile my drawings then move the individual pieces. Between each movement, a new file was saved. This GIF had over 40 files that had to be compiled to create the final GIF.

Once I completed my painting header, I created my Advanced 2D Design header. This one took the most drawing prep and the most files, 60 PNG files were compiled for this one, and it honestly could’ve used more to create smoother transitions. Because we cover so many different types of art in this class, I wanted to make sure it was properly represented in the header, and I couldn’t bring myself to save anymore PNG files. So the quick drawing pencil and painting brush are here to stay for awhile.

The process of creating a GIF was so satisfying that it inspired a project. I plan to incorporate this assignment into my drawing class. After focusing on drawing techniques and basics, this assignment gives students a week of breathing space. They get to create whatever they want and transform it into a GIF. It’s a perfect way to bring technology and art together to create something that many students are very familiar with.

This lesson plan is available on my Teachers Pay Teachers site here. It includes a PowerPoint to introduce the assignment, a detailed lesson plan with step by step teacher instructions, a supply list, big ideas, a rubric, and national standards. It also has a PowerPoint with detailed instructions on how to compile images into a GIF, with a handout for students to reference once they start. At the end of all my lessons I try to make time for a class critique of the project. This lesson plan pack also includes my critique worksheet and a fun addition to the critique process with emoji signs.

Thanks for taking the time to check out my fancy new GIFs and my GIF drawing lesson plan. Help me spread the word about art education and art in general by sharing this post with others. Thanks for stopping by!

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TPT: Semester Long Introduction to Sculpture and Ceramics Curriculum

I am continuing on my journey of compiling my almost 9 years of teaching resources to create my complete high school art curriculum. So far, I have my Introduction to Art, Painting, Advanced 2D or AP Art Breadth, and now my Introduction to Sculpture and Ceramics curriculums complete. This leaves drawing (which I am currently compiling), 3D Design II, Advanced 3D Design, and a yearlong AP Art curriculum. Once I have all the courses covered, I will create one mass bundle pack for my Teachers Pay Teachers store.

I am excited to have my sculpture and ceramics curriculum finally up. I taught the class for 5 years, between two schools and two very different looking art budgets. At my current, fancy private school job I had a large budget for my class. It was an appropriate amount in order to properly teach my students both sculpture and ceramics, which both require a range of expensive materials and equipment. I never felt like I was able to do the course justice it my last school, but I felt I could develop a well rounded curriculum here.

During the semester students are introduced to clay, mixed media, leather, glass fusing, installation art, and tissue paper sculpture through 8 projects. They learn a variety of build techniques with clay, including pinch pots, slab building, coils, and using the pottery wheel. In addition to building with clay, they are also introduced to high, low and raku firing techniques. On the sculpture side of things they learn about installation art, by creating a packaging tape person, mask making, using leather, mold making, using clay and plaster, light sculpture, using tissue paper and reed, and glass fusing.

With all of my projects I like to start with a PowerPoint. I include a piece of art history, artist exemplars, project examples, step by step instructions, and a breakdown of my project expectations and grading. This curriculum pack has a PowerPoint with every project for a total of 13 PowerPoints. I include my PowerPoints on my class blog, that way if students miss a project introduction they can look through the slides themselves.

In addition to having a PowerPoint with every project, I also have a lesson plan, which includes big ideas, objectives, vocabulary, supply list, and step by step instructions. In this curriculum I have a rubric for every major project, checklists for smaller assignments, as well as critique sheets, research worksheets, and how to handouts. I have resources to help guide my students through every assignment.

With this curriculum you will not have to plan a single activity for the semester, it’s already done. I also include my visual journal project pack, which I have my students work on every Friday, which is listed on TPT for $25.00 on it’s own. I also have bonus items: a pottery wheel how to video, semester long timeline, and semester long supply list. All in all this pack includes the following items:
-Semester long timeline
-Supply list
-Syllabus
-Get to Know you handout
-6 student handouts
-4 teacher aid handouts
-11 lesson plans
-13 PowerPoints
-11 rubrics
-8 critique sheets
-1 How To Video

I hope this can help someone get started with a new year of teaching, new class, or just a set of fresh ideas.

Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog! Help me spread the word by sharing with others. Visit my TPT store here.

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Visual Journal Page 22: The Fall & Visual Journal Page 23: Ouch

This visual journal page was created to represent my clumsiness. Not only am I clumsy, but I also bruise easily, which means I am in a constant state of being covered with bumps, scratches, and lovely shades of purples, yellows, and blues. I don’t think I ever quite grew into myself, my limbs still feel like they are longer than they should be.

Specifically, this page is meant to represent a particular incident of clumsiness, a tumble down the stairs. When I move from point a to point b my goal is to move as quickly as possible without breaking into a run. My fast walking combined with my long legs makes it look like I’m always in a rush. The same is applied when I am going up and down stairs. I don’t take them one at a time, carefully watching my step, I generally jog up and jog down. I blame my need for speed on my father who was the type to wait in the car, with the car running, until everyone finally piled in to leave. I always felt rushed, and that has continued into my adult life.

95% of the time my jog up, jog down stair taking is successful. However, the remaining 5% of the time means I miss a step or slip on a step either falling up, or falling down the stairs. On this particular day I hit a step heading down, my foot slipped out from under me, and down I went.

Unfortunately, the slip happened towards the top of the stairs, so I had a long way to go to reach the bottom. It felt like a cartoon, my butt hit the next step, and there was no going back. I literally slide down the stairs until something stopped by downward fall, which happened to be the side table next to my front door.

My next visual journal page represents my husband’s point of view. He was sitting on our sofa, watching TV, minding his own business, when all of the sudden I came tumbling down. All he heard was bam, bam, bam, bam, as my various body parts hit step after step, followed by a final smash as I collided with our red side table. The commotion was followed by back and forth rock of the table as it tried to rebalance after my collision.

I had to lay there for just a minute to allow my brain to catch up to the events and my body to recover. My big toe made contact with the table first, and absorbed the weight that followed behind it. It caused a bruised toe and cracked nail. My right arm made the first, and only, attempt, and fail, to break my fall and stop the ensuing events. That resulted in a big bruise on my forearm. After the tumble and a moment of recovery, I couldn’t help but laugh at myself. I could be so careless and I had no one to blame but myself.

Despite the sequence of events you can still find me jogging up and down stairs and falling 5% of the time.

SUPPLIES

  • Visual Journal
  • Rubber cement
  • Pencil
  • Gesso
  • Paint brush
  • Water
  • Charcoal
  • Charcoal pencil
  • Pastels
  • Red acrylic paint
  • Book Pages
  • Laser printed images of table
  • Packaging tape
  • Scissors
  • Sharpie

HOW TO

To create these two visual journal pages I wanted to create two very different looks. I wanted the actual fall to look dark and more serious. For the aftermath, I wanted it to look as silly as I felt. I started with the fall page and decided early on to shade on top of a gesso base. Since gesso is a wet material, I opted to rip two pages from my book so I could work on them without the risk of the gesso bleeding through to other pages.

I sketched out the design first using pencil. My staircase at home is simple and straight, but I wanted to create a more dramatic effect so I opted to exaggerate the style. I sketched out the twisting staircase, and centered the final set of stairs between the two pages. To the left of the stairs I drew out my right hand and right foot, to show my injuries. Once I had the base sketches ready, I added water to my gesso, to make it more transparent, and filled in the shapes.

Once the gesso dried I began pulling out details using the charcoal pencil. I added purple and brown pastels to create shadows on the stairs and the bruise on my arm and toe. I added black charcoal around the staircase to make it pop. To create a blended look with the charcoal I colored more heavily at the edge of the stairs, then used my finger and a paper towel to blend the charcoal away from the steps and into the background. I continued to build up details with the charcoal pencil and push my shadows with the pastel and black charcoal.

Once I finished shading I painted my toe nails bright red using red acrylic paint. I liked the sudden pop of color and it created a great attention grabber. I used a thin brush and gesso to add the crack in my toenail.

Once the page was finished I sprayed it with fixative, to prevent the charcoal from smudging, and glued it on top of pages still attached in my visual journal book.

For the second page I wanted a more playful look and I wanted to create a sense of movement in the table. I decided to create 5 packaging tape transfers of the same image of my side table, then overlap them to make it look like it was moving. To do this, I printed 5 copies of the table on a laser printer. I taped clear packaging tape to the front of the pictures, then cut out the table. I then ran the cut outs under water until the paper started to separate from the tape. I carefully rubbed the paper off using my fingertips until only the ink from the printed image was left on the tape. I dried it off using paper towels and set them aside.

I decided to use book pages from two different books to create a space for the table to sit in. I used the lighter, wider book pages first and glued them to the center of my visual journal page using rubber cement. I then layered two smaller, darker book pages in the center of the ones I just glued and also glued them down with rubber cement. Next, I placed my table packaging tape image transfers on the right side of the book spread. I used Elmer’s glue to glue them in place, the chemicals in rubber cement will cause the tape to ripple.

Next, I decided to add another thin bar of the light and dark book pages to the top and write “bam, bam, bam” in Sharpie across it. To balance the layout I added one small section of layered book pages to the right page below the table and wrote “ouch” in black Sharpie.

CHALLENGE

Create a visual journal page about an unfortunate accident.

Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog! Help me spread the word about visual journals and art in general by sharing with others. Thanks for stopping by!

DIY Craft Project: Dining Room Table Repaint

I have always wanted a bench, farmhouse style table, and years back I got my wish. My Uncle’s Mom had one they needed to find a new home for while prepping their house to sell. I immediately jumped on it, and brought it home to complete our dining room. Although the finish was darker than what I planned, it worked well in our small, and very bright dining room. However, once little man Cooper came in the picture, things began to change.

As Cooper hit his milestones, smiling, laughing, sitting up, crawling, and walking, our house felt smaller and smaller. His toys began taking over our small living room and I began brainstorming some alternatives. I eventually decided it was time to say goodbye to our sweet dining room. We rarely ate in there, only when we entertained guests, and it wasn’t the best use of the space. It has since been transformed into Cooper’s playroom. It was the perfect solution. It’s situated right off our living room, and we can easily gate the doorway, to keep him in and dogs out. It was tight as a dining room, it was converted form a porch to a room years before we purchased the house, but it’s the perfect size for an almost two year old and his things.

The loss of the dining room meant I had to move around and store some of my beloved furniture. If you read my blog, you know I collect pieces of furniture like people collect jewelry. Each piece is special, important, and carefully selected. My beautiful, white, round kitchen table is now living in our attic. Hopefully that is a temporary spot, once I have a studio space or larger kitchen it will come back out to the light of day. Our farmhouse table was moved to take the spot my kitchen table used to occupy. I decided this was the better choice, since this offered more seating. The dining table is slightly large for the space, it must be pulled out if we ever have enough people to seat around it. But, it gives us a place to entertain and eventually have family dinners.

The dark wood that once worked in the dining room suddenly felt very outdated and heavy in our little kitchen nook. I decided I needed to take a risk and try painting it, shockingly something I have never done on a larger piece of furniture. I did some research, collected my supplies, and got to work.

SUPPLIES:

  • Furniture to refinish
  • Heavy duty cleaner like Trisodium Phosphate (or decent cleaner)
  • Chalk paint, for this size project I used 2 quarts of paint.
  • Paint brushes
  • Rollers
  • Paint tray
  • A lot of paper towels or rags
  • Drop cloth
  • Sandpaper

HOW TO:

Step one: I live with hairy animals, so I knew this was a project that couldn’t be completed in my house. I moved the table and benches down to our garage. I laid out a big drop cloth, set everything on top and got to work cleaning.

Step two: Thoroughly clean the furniture. I recently refinished my kitchen cabinets and used the cleaner, Trisodium Phosphate. It’s a harsh chemical that is not environmentally friendly or health friendly, but it does the trick. I decided it’s better to use it for these types of projects since I am doing it on such a small scale and so infrequently. I didn’t use it for my table, and I wish I had. Instead I used my standard cleaners and did my best cleaning the dust, etc. It worked well enough, but there are spots I think the paint would have stuck better if I was more thorough at this stage.

Step three: Start painting! With chalkboard paint there is no sanding or stripping required, which is why I chose to go that route. Paint a solid coat, let it dry for 24 hours, and add coat number two. This project took awhile because I was covering such a dark piece it took 3 coats of paint. I also had to rotate the piece so I could get underneath and between all the decorative sections.

Step four: Once you have the coverage and look you want, you are done! Move it back into the space and enjoy. For this, my step four was adding a clear coat. I wanted a smoother, slicker finish, which the chalkboard paint doesn’t offer. However, the clear coat I used ended up turning a yellowish color so I do not recommend doing this.

Optional step five: I opted to go back in with sandpaper to rough up some of the edges. I didn’t go crazy with sanding, since the wood beneath is so dark I was worried it would compete with the white if I let too much show through. I hit the edges in a few spots with the sandpaper, just enough to show a little dark through the white paint. I also had to sand down the many drips I ended up with.

I am very happy with my finished product. The fact that the table really is too large for the space is downplayed now that the table is a lighter color. I also love the way my beautiful, blue Crate and Barrel chairs look with the white finish. Please excuse the missing chair, it also has to serve the purpose of high chair holder for Cooper when we don’t have guests over, and I didn’t even realize it wasn’t there for my final picture.

Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog! Help me spread the word about crafting, DIY, art making, etc. by sharing on your social media site of choice. Thanks for stopping by!

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