Tag: visual journals

My Summer of TPT + TPT Back to School Sale (8/1, 8/2/18)

I can’t believe it’s that time of year again. It’s BACK TO SCHOOL! Where did summer go? My summer went to pools, beaches, baby snuggles, and a ton of TPT ing.

My little family enjoyed a much needed out of town vacation in Hilton Head Island, SC. One of my favorite parts of being a teacher is the time I get with my sweet babies during summer. I ate up every minute of it while the babies were awake. But, every minute their little heads were on their pillows I was at my computer getting ready for today. The back to school sale!

I have seemingly endless ideas for TPT products, and my ever growing to do list certainly reflects this. I have hit it hard since the start of summer and have put together a bunch of new products and some major bundles. August 1st and 2nd my entire store will be 20% off, plus an extra 5% from TPT added at checkout. This is huge especially for my 5 curriculum, $300.00 bundle. See details below.

This is a goal I have been working toward for a couple of years. When I first started working on curriculums, with my Intro to Art curriculum, I realized there was a market out there for these types of products. That motivated me to post my personal curriculums for drawing, painting, advanced 2D, intro to sculpture and ceramics, and AP art. My goal has always been to build each curriculum individually then create a mega bundle, a complete high school visual art course load. Originally I wanted to also include 3D, but it will take more time to get there. Instead, I went ahead and put together my 2D high school mega curriculum bundle . It includes:

I have this listed for $300.00, a $35.00 discount. This is everything you need to teach every single day in 5 different art courses. With 25% off this bundle will be just $225.00, a lot of money for an art teacher, but a steal for the amount of content.

I already wrote about my AP Art curriculum here, so I won’t repeat myself. But I am so proud of this bundle. This would’ve been a huge help to me as a 1st year AP teacher, and I hope it can serve that for someone else. I have already gotten a number of questions about this curriculum vs. my advanced 2D curriculum. They are totally different and if you teach both I recommend getting both. That way you won’t have to redesign AP once your advanced kids move up. This will be just $75.00 with the 25% discount. 

After completing my 5 curriculum bundle I decided to return to a project I started last year, a save the brushes poster. It was a quirky way to show students what happens if you don’t care for supplies and tips on how to prevent ruining brushes. As an art teacher I have many supplies at risk of student abuse. Over the school year I made it a point to photograph supply disasters as they happened in my room. I then turned those photos into save the glue, palettes, markers, paint, paint pumps, paint tubes, sinks, erasers, and pencils. I now have a poster bundle of “Save the…” posters. This is bundled for $17.60, and will be marked down to $13.20.

In my advanced 2D and AP art curriculums I made it a point to develop critiques to go along with every project. That lead me to the idea of creating a critique bundle. This includes 20 general critiques that could go with any type of project at any level. They are fun. get kids moving, thinking, and verbalizing their opinions. This lists for $37.60, but will be marked down to $28.20 on 8/1/18 and 8/2/18.

In addition to my own massive to do list, I have also decided to team up with my amazing coworker, Meagan Brooker, and my amazing mom, Anne Ward. Meagan teaches drawing, photography, and AP art at our school. She is also a professional photographer on the side and is responsible for all our family photos for the last six years, many of which are proudly printed on our annual Christmas cards. Photography is a hobby of mine, but professional, manual photography is totally out of my comfort zone. I know there is a need out there for good digital photography lessons, so that is where Meagan comes in. She hands over her awesome lessons and I TPT ify them: adding detailed lesson plans, PowerPoints, and clarifying instructions so anyone, professional photographer or not, can follow them.

Meagan and my first collaboration is an introduction to photography lesson. This focuses more on setting up a successful photograph from step 1, rather than relying on editing later. It emphasizes the elements of photography and rules of composition. This has two projects in one. It lists for $8.00 but will be marked down to $6.00 the 1st and 2nd of August.

My mom is a retired art teacher of over 30 years. She has a ridiculous wealth of knowledge in this subject area and still teaches private lessons, summer camp, and consults in her former school county. She specialized in printmaking in college, which is why I am so excited that the first bundle we are working towards is a K-5th printmaking bundle. It will not only include amazing lessons, but also how to set up your classroom to help printmaking run as smooth as possible. We will be working over the next year (or more) on a comprehensive K-5 yearlong curriculum. Our first printmaking lesson is a kindergarten fish monoprint. More is coming soon!

School starts for me 8/6/18, I am equal parts ready and not ready. But, I am making some changes in my classroom and can’t wait to share them here. I am hoping I can keep my summer stamina going and keep posting almost as frequently during the school year.

I have new motivation as my husband quit his job in May to pursue building is own company. This is something we have discussed for years, and TPT has made it a reality. I am so proud that my hard work is paying off and I can support my family in this way. TPT has provided a space for teachers to share their ideas with others, and I am so grateful I discovered it, gave it a try, and stuck it out.

Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog! Don’t forget to check out the TPT sale 8/1/18-8/2/18. If you are reading this after the fact, I promise my products are still worth every penny even at full price! Thanks for stopping by.

Story Bazaar LA: A Visual Journal Journey

I have been visual journaling for the past 8 years primarily for myself and my students. But, and a couple of weeks ago I packed up one of my visual journals to head off on a journey across the country from Atlanta to LA to an event called Story Bazaar LA.

One of my longest and dearest friends, Elly, has put her time and energy into an amazing cause for a local LA charity, Ruckus Roots. They focus on bringing the arts to underprivileged youth in the Los Angeles area, something I am also passionate about. The focus of her event is story telling through a variety of mediums: poetry, fiction, fact, film, photography, music, and other forms of art.

My visual journals focus on telling the story of my life through both mundane and milestone events. Naturally, my journals fit into the theme of Elly’s project, so when she asked if she could use one, I gladly got one ready to ship.

My “Between the Lines” visual journal was mailed to Los Angeles, CA a couple of weeks ago and will be on display at the event on Sunday (6/24/18). Elly plans to have the book open to a specific page, with a blurb about the page next to it. I couldn’t decide which page to choose, so I sent her three options to pick from. You can check out my “Breathe In, Breathe Out” page here, “My Hands” page here, and Don’t Stop Arts is below (a blog post about this one will be coming soon).

I am flattered and excited to be a part of such an important and useful event. I wish I could’ve traveled alongside my visual journal to attend the event, but I will have to live vicariously through pictures and stories after the storytelling event closes.

If you live in the LA area and want more information check out the event page here, facebook page here, and get tickets here. Remember, all proceeds are donated to the amazing organization, Ruckus Roots.

Thanks for stopping by!

Teachers Pay Teachers: AP Art Curriculum including Breadth, Concentration, and Quality

For the past year I have been working crazy hard to get a comprehensive high school art curriculum put together on my Teachers Pay Teachers site. I started with my Introduction to Art curriculum, and it quickly gained popularity. I realized there was a market for complete curriculums so teachers can worry about focusing on their students and whats going on in their classrooms, rather than the lesson plans.

After the success of my Intro to Art curriculum I formulated a plan. I would create a curriculum bundle back for all the high school art courses I have experience with, then bundle all of those into a mega-super-TPT-art bundle. As of last week I completed my AP Art 2D Design and Drawing curriculum, which completed my 2D focused high school art curriculum. This huge bundle includes year-long intro to art, advanced art, and AP art curriculums and semester long drawing and painting curriculums.

This was a HUGE accomplishment for me and a goal I’ve been working towards for a year. However, for this blog post I am going to focus on the details of my AP Art bundle, and save the high school art curriculum for a later post. Check out the details of my AP Studio Art course below.

I taught AP Art for a few years at my last job, and loved it, but it was an overwhelming task to take on. It’s difficult to motivate students to produce the amount of work required for the AP art portfolio. After taking a break from teaching it and a lot of reflection, I began developing some material that would have helped me a lot in the beginning.

I did go through an AP certification course, but it’s a single week in the summer. I get a ton of good information and head start on the year, but the things we covered quickly left my brain as we got into the grittiness that is spring semester. If I make my way back to teaching AP art at my current job, I am excited to now have these resources to help me, and my students stay on top of the rigorous schedule.

In addition the meat of the AP art portfolio, projects for breath, concentration, and quality, I also include a yearlong timeline, printable calendar with every deadline, homework assignments, AP Art application, syllabus, parent and student agreement, summer work, supply list, sticker chart, and so much more. I have specifics that go along with each portfolio section as well as lesson plans, presentations, and evaluation sheets to go with each project.

BREADTH ASSIGNMENTS:

The breath section requires 12 works of art submitted (for 2D Design and Drawing portfolios), which can include details. I lay out 14 breadth assignments to be completed in semester one. This may seem like a lot, but some take longer than others, and it’s important for students to be able to select their best works of art, which means ideally more than 12 are created. In my breadth bundle in addition to project information I include lesson plans, handouts, evaluation sheets, critique sheets, PowerPoints, examples, and more for every project. Below are details on the 14 assignments:

Semester Long Canvas:

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • A focus on working on a work of art for an extended period of time, encouraging creativity and problem solving.
  • The ability to take breaks and work on it when inspiration hits.
  • Artist exemplars: Gustav Klimt and Pirkko Makela-Haapalinna

Bones and Exoskeletons

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • A focus on technical ability, value, and object studies.
  • Putting their own spin on a traditional subject matter.
  • Artist exemplars: Albrecht Durer and Jason Borders.

Perspective

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • A focus on technical ability, foreshortening, and displaying understanding of perspective in art.
  • Artist exemplars: M.C. Escher and Stephen Wright.

Design

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • A focus on design elements in both the 2D design and drawing portfolios.
  • Show an understanding of using the elements of art and principles of design in a work of art.
  • Artist exemplars: Jasper Johns, Leonardo da Vinci, and Barbara Kruger.

Portrait with Words

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • A focus on value, line quality, portraiture, and a connection between text and imagery.
  • Artist exemplars: Leslie Nichols, Jamie Poole, and Michael Volpicellis

Ordinary Behavior

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • Focus on elevating the ordinary subject matter through the composition and medium.
  • Artist exemplars: Henry Mosler, Ralph Goings, and William Wray.

Action Portrait

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • Artist exemplars: Edgar Degas and Nikunj Rathod
  • Focus on using the elements of art and principles of design to create a sense of movement.
  • Creating a dynamic work of art.

Abstract Acrylic

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • Artist exemplars: Piet Mondrian, Wassily Kandinsky, and Mark Rothko
  • A focus on line, shape, color, balance, unity, and focal point.

Unusual Interiors

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • Focus on light, perspective, and overlooked or not typically seen as “beautiful” interior spaces.
  • Artist exemplars: Edward Hopper and Richard Estes.

Layers and Mixed Media

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • Focus on layers, mixed media, and blurring the lines between the figure/ground relationship through stable, reversible, and ambiguous figure/ground.
  • Artist exemplars: Juan Gris and Christina McPhee

Satire in Art

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • Focus on a current issue through satire and humor.
  • Artist exemplars: James Gillray, Nate Beeler, and Paul Kuczynski

10 Interesting Photographs

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • Turn one of the student’s 10 interesting photographs homework assignment into a work of art.
  • Artist exemplars: Student selects one through research.

Scan & RepurposeEverything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • Take a work of art from earlier in the semester or a previous art course and turn it into a new work of art.
  • Scan the old work of art into the computer and digitally manipulate it or scan, print, and complete a transfer onto a new background.
  • Artist exemplars: Student selects one through research.

Visual Jourmal

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • Eight visual journal pages are due by the end of the semester.

CONCENTRATION:

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

The concentration section of the portfolio requires 12 works of art (for 2D design and drawing portfolios) that all fit under one theme. My concentration bundle pack includes 2D Design and Drawing specific introduction PowerPoints as well as lesson plans, handouts, information sheets, evaluation sheets, critique reminders and more. This bundle is meant to serve as a guide for how students can pick a topic that can last through at least 12 works of art.

QUALITY:

The quality section of the AP art portfolio has the students select 5 of their best works of art to be physically mailed in to be evaluated. My quality bundle pack includes details and information sheets to help guide the students, a PowerPoint, lesson plan, submission guidelines, teacher tips, planning an AP art exhibit, and so much more.

The AP Art bundle is my largest curriculum undertaking to date. I have spent endless hours putting it together, and I must say I am very proud. Since it was posted last week, I have already sold a few, and I can’t wait to hear feedback.

Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog. Help me spread the word by sharing with others. Check out my other TPT and art education blog posts here. Check out my other TPT products here. Thanks for stopping by!

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.
Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.
Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

Visual Journal Page 33: The Bee Incident

This visual journal page reflects my attempt to enjoy a beautiful spring day.

My former classroom was large with a lot of windows and natural light. While it isn’t as beautiful as my current set up (I am so spoiled) I did have a door to the outside, which was a huge perk.

There was something about the ability to walk outside and take a breath of fresh air that felt freeing. It was also functional in classes that often used spray paint, fixative, and other hazardous materials. Many days I would prop the door open, letting the fresh air into my stagnant room, and more often than not, pretend I was not stuck in a classroom with a bunch of wild teenagers.

Every now and then a creature from the great outdoors would find its way into my classroom. It would cause momentary chaos until it found its way back out again, but it was worth the risk to have fresh air.

Or so I thought.

One particular day I was standing by my desk talking with a student, a class full of kids working hard behind them, when all of the sudden I felt an odd sensation on my leg. It started off with a tingle and quickly escalated to a burn. I immediately looked down and discovered the culprit, a bee had decided to attack me.

I resisted every urge to yell, curse, jump up and down, and cry. As calmly as I could I stated the obvious “A bee stung me!” and sent my student back to their seat. I was slightly incredulous, I was just standing there, that bee came into my room, why did it feel a need to sting me?

As the pain began to subside I couldn’t help but feel bad for the bee. All I wanted was fresh air, and instead I got a stinger in my leg and a dead bee on my floor. For the rest of class I walked around helping my kids and couldn’t help but bring up my injury. They smiled, nodded, and patiently waited for me to answer their actual art related questions. I’m sure they thought I was being dramatic but until I could no longer feel the stinger in my leg, I couldn’t help but discuss it.

My takeaway: at least I didn’t curse in front of 35 teenagers.

SUPPLIES

  • Visual journal
  • Glue
  • Paper
  • Pencil
  • Watercolor
  • Paintbrush
  • Water
  • Thin sharpie
  • Book pages
  • Scissors

HOW TO

This visual journal page was created shortly after the incident. I felt I needed to express my feelings, since my students weren’t interested in listening to me complain about my injury. I knew I wanted to focus on the bee since it was the cause of the incident, but also because insects are very interesting to draw and paint.

I started by sketching the bee shape out on a separate sheet of paper. I then began filling the bee in with watercolor. I quickly decided I wanted to splatter the the paint away from the bee to create a strong focal point and sense of movement. As soon as I filled in the color I would blow the watercolor away from my drawing. I did the painting in sections. I painted all of the black first, then let it dry before moving to the next part. This prevented the color from blending together. Watercolor will only stay where the paper is wet, if it’s surrounded by dry, for the most part, it will only stay in the wet section.

After painting my bee and letting it dry, I cut it out. I began playing with placement on my visual journal page, but had a hard time figuring it out. It was too simple to just put the bee down, but I didn’t want to fill up another page with ripped up book pages. I decided to pull two pages from different books and played around with overlapping them. I thought about gluing the bee down to one, cutting it out, then repeating to get a wider paper edge around the painting, but had also been using that technique a lot in my visual journal up to that point. I finally laid the full pages down on the right side page and liked the look. It almost looked like the bee was laying on paper left on the floor (a common occurrence in my classroom).

Next, I began brainstorming ways to incorporate the text and add some visuals to the left side page. I eventually landed on creating a line out of book pages that would mimic the bee’s flight line, until it’s untimely demise. I used the line as a space to incorporate my text: “I had a very difficult time trying to maintain my composure.”

CHALLENGE

Create a visual journal page about a bug. It can be an incident with a bug, a study of a bug, or your favorite bug.

Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog! Help me spread the word about my blog and visual journals by sharing with others. Thanks for stopping by!

Visual Journal Page 32: Panetta Makes Me Think of Butter?

A visual journal page made using colored pencils.

Before I was a Panetta I was a Ward. For 23 years I had a simple, four letter, easy to pronounce last name. There was never any confusion or stuttering over letters. I never realized the benefits of a simple name until I got married and became a Panetta. While I do sometimes have fun with the “Are you related to Leon Panetta?” question, dealing with mispronunciations have already gotten old. I’m no longer Whitney Ward I am Whitney P-A-N-E-T-T-A, Panetta. You have to spell it out. Every time.

Over the past nine years of my teaching career my students have come up with many creative nicknames for me. They always stay pretty close to the original: Mrs. Pinata, Panera, Picasso. I’ve also had shortened versions, Mrs. P, Mrs. P-Net. My students get the Italian heritage. I once had a student decorate my white board with a drawing of spaghetti and baguettes because, according to her, Panetta made her think of spaghetti and baguettes (check out that visual journal page here).

All of those nicknames and thought processes made sense to me. But one day a student told me my last name reminded them of butter. Panetta, butter, Panetta, butter, I just don’t see the connection. And since I couldn’t figure out the logic behind it, I dealt with this new interpretation of my name the best way I know how. I made a visual journal page about it.

Panetta reminds me of butter?

SUPPLIES:

  • Visual journal
  • Colored pencils
  • Pencil
  • White paper
  • Book pages
  • Glue
  • Scissors

HOW TO

To create this visual journal page, I decided to keep it simple. I opted to use colored pencil and book pages to create a simple collage that got to the point.

First, I used colored pencils to create lines in the background.

Next, I sketched out butter on a butter dish and a knife on a separate sheet of paper.

I filled the sketch in with colored pencil, slowly building up the colors in thin layers. With each new layer I tried to vary the color and add shadows and highlights to create depth. As I built up the color in the butter, I used darker shades of yellow to create text in the butter: “Panetta reminds me of butter?” While the text blends very well into the shape of the butter, it is difficult to read. Looking back, I would’ve cleaned up the text to make it more legible. Check out a lesson that goes in depth on using colored pencils here. 

Once the colored pencil drawing was complete, I cut it out, and glued the two pieces on top of old book pages. I cut the drawings back out, leaving an edge of book pages around both drawings.

I glued the butter dish down first, then overlapped the knife to complete the page.

TIP: use a credit card to push paper into the crease of your visual journal book.

CHALLENGE

Create a visual journal page about your last name.

Thanks for taking to the time and checking out my blog. Help spread the word about visual journaling by sharing it with others. Are you interested in teaching visual journals in your classroom? Check out my visual journal bundle here and my how to worksheets here. Thanks for stopping by!

 

A visual journal made with colored pencils and book pages.