Tag: project

Teachers Pay Teachers: AP Art Curriculum including Breadth, Concentration, and Quality

For the past year I have been working crazy hard to get a comprehensive high school art curriculum put together on my Teachers Pay Teachers site. I started with my Introduction to Art curriculum, and it quickly gained popularity. I realized there was a market for complete curriculums so teachers can worry about focusing on their students and whats going on in their classrooms, rather than the lesson plans.

After the success of my Intro to Art curriculum I formulated a plan. I would create a curriculum bundle back for all the high school art courses I have experience with, then bundle all of those into a mega-super-TPT-art bundle. As of last week I completed my AP Art 2D Design and Drawing curriculum, which completed my 2D focused high school art curriculum. This huge bundle includes year-long intro to art, advanced art, and AP art curriculums and semester long drawing and painting curriculums.

This was a HUGE accomplishment for me and a goal I’ve been working towards for a year. However, for this blog post I am going to focus on the details of my AP Art bundle, and save the high school art curriculum for a later post. Check out the details of my AP Studio Art course below.

I taught AP Art for a few years at my last job, and loved it, but it was an overwhelming task to take on. It’s difficult to motivate students to produce the amount of work required for the AP art portfolio. After taking a break from teaching it and a lot of reflection, I began developing some material that would have helped me a lot in the beginning.

I did go through an AP certification course, but it’s a single week in the summer. I get a ton of good information and head start on the year, but the things we covered quickly left my brain as we got into the grittiness that is spring semester. If I make my way back to teaching AP art at my current job, I am excited to now have these resources to help me, and my students stay on top of the rigorous schedule.

In addition the meat of the AP art portfolio, projects for breath, concentration, and quality, I also include a yearlong timeline, printable calendar with every deadline, homework assignments, AP Art application, syllabus, parent and student agreement, summer work, supply list, sticker chart, and so much more. I have specifics that go along with each portfolio section as well as lesson plans, presentations, and evaluation sheets to go with each project.

BREADTH ASSIGNMENTS:

The breath section requires 12 works of art submitted (for 2D Design and Drawing portfolios), which can include details. I lay out 14 breadth assignments to be completed in semester one. This may seem like a lot, but some take longer than others, and it’s important for students to be able to select their best works of art, which means ideally more than 12 are created. In my breadth bundle in addition to project information I include lesson plans, handouts, evaluation sheets, critique sheets, PowerPoints, examples, and more for every project. Below are details on the 14 assignments:

Semester Long Canvas:

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • A focus on working on a work of art for an extended period of time, encouraging creativity and problem solving.
  • The ability to take breaks and work on it when inspiration hits.
  • Artist exemplars: Gustav Klimt and Pirkko Makela-Haapalinna

Bones and Exoskeletons

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • A focus on technical ability, value, and object studies.
  • Putting their own spin on a traditional subject matter.
  • Artist exemplars: Albrecht Durer and Jason Borders.

Perspective

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • A focus on technical ability, foreshortening, and displaying understanding of perspective in art.
  • Artist exemplars: M.C. Escher and Stephen Wright.

Design

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • A focus on design elements in both the 2D design and drawing portfolios.
  • Show an understanding of using the elements of art and principles of design in a work of art.
  • Artist exemplars: Jasper Johns, Leonardo da Vinci, and Barbara Kruger.

Portrait with Words

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • A focus on value, line quality, portraiture, and a connection between text and imagery.
  • Artist exemplars: Leslie Nichols, Jamie Poole, and Michael Volpicellis

Ordinary Behavior

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • Focus on elevating the ordinary subject matter through the composition and medium.
  • Artist exemplars: Henry Mosler, Ralph Goings, and William Wray.

Action Portrait

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • Artist exemplars: Edgar Degas and Nikunj Rathod
  • Focus on using the elements of art and principles of design to create a sense of movement.
  • Creating a dynamic work of art.

Abstract Acrylic

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • Artist exemplars: Piet Mondrian, Wassily Kandinsky, and Mark Rothko
  • A focus on line, shape, color, balance, unity, and focal point.

Unusual Interiors

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • Focus on light, perspective, and overlooked or not typically seen as “beautiful” interior spaces.
  • Artist exemplars: Edward Hopper and Richard Estes.

Layers and Mixed Media

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • Focus on layers, mixed media, and blurring the lines between the figure/ground relationship through stable, reversible, and ambiguous figure/ground.
  • Artist exemplars: Juan Gris and Christina McPhee

Satire in Art

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • Focus on a current issue through satire and humor.
  • Artist exemplars: James Gillray, Nate Beeler, and Paul Kuczynski

10 Interesting Photographs

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • Turn one of the student’s 10 interesting photographs homework assignment into a work of art.
  • Artist exemplars: Student selects one through research.

Scan & RepurposeEverything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • Take a work of art from earlier in the semester or a previous art course and turn it into a new work of art.
  • Scan the old work of art into the computer and digitally manipulate it or scan, print, and complete a transfer onto a new background.
  • Artist exemplars: Student selects one through research.

Visual Jourmal

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

  • Eight visual journal pages are due by the end of the semester.

CONCENTRATION:

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

The concentration section of the portfolio requires 12 works of art (for 2D design and drawing portfolios) that all fit under one theme. My concentration bundle pack includes 2D Design and Drawing specific introduction PowerPoints as well as lesson plans, handouts, information sheets, evaluation sheets, critique reminders and more. This bundle is meant to serve as a guide for how students can pick a topic that can last through at least 12 works of art.

QUALITY:

The quality section of the AP art portfolio has the students select 5 of their best works of art to be physically mailed in to be evaluated. My quality bundle pack includes details and information sheets to help guide the students, a PowerPoint, lesson plan, submission guidelines, teacher tips, planning an AP art exhibit, and so much more.

The AP Art bundle is my largest curriculum undertaking to date. I have spent endless hours putting it together, and I must say I am very proud. Since it was posted last week, I have already sold a few, and I can’t wait to hear feedback.

Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog. Help me spread the word by sharing with others. Check out my other TPT and art education blog posts here. Check out my other TPT products here. Thanks for stopping by!

Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.
Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.
Everything you need to teach an entire year in AP Studio Art including breadth, concentration and quality sections.

Mixed Media Artwork: “Caged” and “Trapped” Interpreted

Mixed Media-Caged and Trapped

Last January I received an e-mail from a high school student in Birmingham, England asking if I could help them with an art assignment. As a high school art teacher myself, I was more than happy to help, after all my blog focuses on art tips and how tos. I was expecting a question about materials, a process I covered on my blog, or some other art related technique. However, I was surprised and flattered when I realized the questions didn’t relate to techniques or process, instead they were questions about me. She ran across my two pieces, “Caged” and “Trapped,” and decided to choose me as the subject of her final art assignment.

In this moment I felt like a real artist. I remember contacting one of my favorite artists, George Long, when I was in college. I had to select an influential artist and write a paper about them. I had the opportunity to talk to him on the phone, and interview him for my paper. It was a moment I will never forget, I had direct contact with someone who inspires me, and greatly inspires my artwork. I couldn’t believe the tables were turned and someone was asking me about what I do and why.

Her assignment was to find an artist that inspired her, write a short bio about them, and recreate the work of art that inspired her most. She explained the project and included questions for me to answer. I very quickly answered the following questions: 1) Are they any art movements in your life or you have been connected too, any background information where and when you were born? 2) When was this piece created, what was it created for, why did you use the mediums you did? 3) What were you trying to convey in this piece, what influenced you to do it? 4) How can I link this with my final piece, how can I carry it on to produce something similar? And I followed up with fairly long winded answers and much appreciation for being selected, and how honored I felt. The only thing I asked in return was to see her final product, which she recently sent.

Interpretation of Caged and Trapped

Reinterpretation of Caged and Trapped

To recreate my mixed media pieces she used watercolor, and I think they look amazing! It’s a little surreal seeing my name at the top of a paper, and artwork inspired by mine. I loved having the chance to help someone out with an art project, and I loved having the opportunity to see the finished product. I was even more shocked when a few weeks later I was approached by another student asking if she could use these pieces as inspiration for her art project. Technically I am a “professional artist” since I sell my work, but in this moment for the first time I truly felt like a real life artist.

Thanks for choosing me for your project Amy, and following up with pictures! Your project looks great!

Thanks for visiting my blog. I hope you find something to inspire your next project. Help me spread the word about my arts and crafts blog by sharing it with others! I couldn’t do it without you. Thanks for stopping by!

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Art Lesson: Collaborative Relief

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At my previous school I always taught a lesson on the grid method by creating a collaborative grid with my students. Each student would get a section of the original image, and they had to enlarge and re-draw it. In order to accurately re-draw the image they had to pay attention to where lines and shapes intersected the outside edge of the image, which in turn taught them the basic concept of the grid method (read more about this here).

In the process of changing schools I also changed my teaching title, which meant a lot of new lesson planning was ahead of me. I was now exclusively a sculpture teacher, teaching 3D I and 3D II classes. Although I had taught sculpture in the past, and spent a lot of time in ceramics class in high school and college, I felt a lot of pressure to re-create assignments, and think outside of the box. After all I was moving to a private school with an established and impressive art department, I felt I had big shoes to fill in my new work environment.

Although it has been stressful at times trying to produce examples and create new projects, I have loved every minute of it. It truly is amazing how different a class can be when you actually have the budget to support it. I now had the ability to teach interesting, complex, and creative projects, without the fear of running out of supplies with no money left in my budget.

As excited as I was to have a new challenge in my life, I did miss some of my old projects, including my Intro to Art collaborative grid assignment. One day while reminiscing on the past, as I often do, it dawned on me that I could do a collaborative grid project in sculpture, by focusing on relief carving. I had my doubts that everything would come together during the project, but once all of the pieces were in place, I couldn’t believe how amazing it looked. I am so proud of my students and I hope another sculpture teacher can find an interesting way to implement this into their class.

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THE ASSIGNMENT: Collaborative Relief

OBJECTIVE: For students to learn the history and techniques of relief carving, and apply those techniques in a collaborative relief carving project.

SUPPLIES:

  • Lizella Clay
  • Rolling pin or slab roller
  • Ruler
  • Needle tool or knife
  • A variety of clay tools and textured items to carve and add texture
  • Low fire underglaze (I used blue, green, red, brown)
  • Low fire clear transparent glaze
  • Kiln
  • Wood panel
  • Black Paint
  • Heavy duty glue

STEPS:

1. I began this project by introducing my students to the artists, Brunelleschi and Ghiberti, and the famous Florence Baptistry doors competition. I had the students vote on which “Sacrafice of Isaac” relief they liked better, and we continued to discuss the doors as well as the Gates of Paradise doors.

2. After the history lesson I introduced the assignment. I explained that I would randomly hand out a 1″x1″ section of a larger image, and they would have to recreate it as a relief sculpture on a 6″x6″ clay slab. We discussed carving techniques and looked at the variety of tools they could use to create different textures.

3. After the assignment was explained they got to work. Before they started the project I had taken an image of our Fine Arts building, divided it into a grid, and put a number and letter on the back of each square (1A, 1B, 1C, etc.). I made sure to make a few copies, the students tend to misplace their squares and it helps to have extras on hand. As soon as the students got their slab square cut they had to flip it over and carve the letter and number into the back of it.

4. After the students completed their squares I fired them and had the students glaze them. I knew every line and shape would not line up in the image, so my goal was to create a sense of unity through the glaze. I instructed the students to loosely paint underglaze onto their tile (I set up a few colors of blue, green, brown, and red) allow it to dry, then wipe it off with a wet sponge. This technique caused the underglaze to stick in the textured areas, and wipe off of the smooth area, giving it a loosely painted quality. Once the colors were added they painted a layer of clear glaze on top, and once again wiped it off. I loved the shiny vs. matte look this created.

5. Once the pieces were fired a final time I glued them to a piece of wood I cut to size and painted black. My plan is to eventually add a black frame and display it in the Fine Arts Building.

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My students were as impressed as I was with the final product, and it was a huge hit at our annual art show. I love how each piece is important to the whole, and how it truly came together in the end.

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Thanks for visiting my blog, I hope you find useful information you can use in your classroom! Please comment if you have additional tips, ideas, or have done something similar in your class! Thanks for helping my spread the word about my blog by liking, tweeting, commenting, and subscribing! I couldn’t do it without you!

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Craft Project: Fake Built in Bookcase

I love to read. It is one of my favorite past times to curl up with a good book, take a break from the real world, and escape into the sea of words held in the pages of my most recent reading adventure.

My reading obsession has broaden my world, without ever having to leave my house. But, it is has constricted my closet. My poor books, with nowhere to go, have ended up in boxes filling every closet in my house. I longed for a bookcase to display them, but our small house has little space for the book trophy case I require.

After two years of racking my brain for any available space to display my books, it finally hit me. The space behind our bedroom door at the top of the stairs was a dead space. A small nook, with nothing there. It was a small, narrow space, useless for most things, but perfect for a bookcase.

Nick and I have done A LOT of projects around our house, which has also caused our bank account to sag a bit. My need for a bookcase was trumped by our bank accounts need to withhold funds. However, I was impatient, and as usual I found a way to get it done right away. Rather than spend a lot of time and money constructing a bookcase from scratch I did some research and found two pre-fab bookcases from Target that fit perfectly. I loved the look of the two cases next to each other because it not only filled the space but it also looked more like a unique, custom built bookcase.

Below are the supplies and set-by-step instructions on how I completed this DIY, home improvement, craft project. All you need are a few basic tools, and basic knowledge on how to work them. Due to my impatience (in life and with this project) I decided I wanted to get this project done in one weekend, which also happened to be a weekend Nick was out of town. I am proud to say I did this 100% on my own, which shows how easy it was!

SUPPLIES

  • Pre-fab bookcase
  • Box cutter
  • Paint scrapper
  • Pry bar
  • Hammer
  • Scrap wood
  • Nails
  • Screws
  • Dry wall mollies
  • Screwdriver
  • Circular Saw
  • Caulk
  • Paint
  • Paint brush

HOW TO:

STEP 1: Remove the molding from the wall. I had never done this before and was afraid I would break the molding or punch a hole in the wall. I had to take a minute to allow my impatience to subside before I started my research, gathered my tools, and prepped before I jumped right in.

  • First use a box cutter to slice the caulk between the molding and the wall.
  • Then use a metal scrapper to wedge between the molding and the wall. Wiggle it slowly to loosen the board and the nails.
  • Once you create a space between the molding and wall place a scrap piece of wood on the wall and a pry bar in the space. Slowly pry the molding off with the pry bar, making sure to put pressure on the scrap wood on the wall. This will disperse the weight and prevent the pry bar from punching a hole in the wall.
  • Use a hammer to remove all of the nails.
  • I used a great website to help me with the process, check it out here!

STEP 2: Pre-fab bookcase… While looking around for the perfect case I found that the cheapest places to find bookcases are Target, Walmart, and IKEA. If you are flexible on color and size the process won’t be too difficult. Since I had a very specific size space and wanted a white bookshelf, it took a few weeks plus an in store and online purchase to get what I needed.

  • Put together your bookcase according to the directions that came with it.
  • Place the bookcase in the area you want to install them.
  • Make any adjustments necessary, make sure the bookcase is level.  (Living in a 1940’s home there are a lot of odd things in my house, including uneven walls. I had to place a scrap piece of wood under the front legs of the bookcase in order to push the bookcase against the wall.).
  • Use a screwdriver to create holes through the bookcase and into the wall, to create a pilot hole for the dry wall mollies, and to make it easier to insert screws. When doing this always make sure the drill bit you use is slightly smaller than the screw you are using.
  • Place dry wall mollies where they are needed and use screws to attach the bookshelves to the wall.

STEP 3: Reattaching the molding… I had to take my existing molding and re-cut it in order to piece it together on the front of the bookshelf.

  • Using a circular saw make any adjustments necessary to piece the molding together on the front of your bookshelf. In order to create a clean look on the corners cut the molding at 45 degree angles.
  • Attach the molding to the front of the bookcase and nail it with finishing nails.
  • Spackle on top of the nails heads in order to make them blend in.
  • Caulk the top edge of the molding to create a clean look.

STEP 4: Finishing…

  • Spackle over any holes in the bookshelf. If you are 100% satisfied with the placement of the shelves, Spackle over the shelf adjustment holes in order to make it look like a custom built shelf.
  • Paint the molding to cover up the Spackle, paint the shelf where it is necessary.
  • Put your books on display!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Crafty Project: Jewelry Holder

I recently got fed up with the wad of jewelry I store in my closet. I kept losing things, necklaces got tangled, and my earring pairs separated. Finally I decided it was time to make a jewelry holder. After some brainstorming I decided to take two pre-made frames, one homemade frame, and convert them into jewelry holders.

To make the larger frame I used bead board bought from Home Depot. I had my lovely husband cut the ends to 45 degree angles so I could glue and staple them into a frame. I put wood glue between the joints and clamped them until they were dry. I then took a staple gun and stapled the joints. For additional support I used the small pieces Nick cut off of the bead board and glued and stapled them on top of the joints. Once the frame was prepped I spray painted and sanded it to give it a shabby chic look.

After I had all of my frames ready I glued lace to the back of the frame, so it would show through the opening. The lace made it more interesting and gave a place for clip back earring to hang. After the lace I stapled wire mesh, also purchased at Home Depot, to the back. I then hot glued burlap behind the mesh. I hot glued ribbon around the edge to finish it off. To create the hooks to hang the necklaces on I took wire and bent it with pliers. After was all said and done I added wire to the back of the frame so I can hang it on my wall! This was a relatively simple project to fix a very annoying problem!