Tag: photography

TPT Winter Sale: 25% off

It’s that time of year again, the winter TPT sale! My entire store will be 20% off, with an extra 5% off at checkout, just enter the code: ticktock. As usual, I have been working hard on developing new products and I have a new curriculum bundle ready for you to save big money on tomorrow and Wednesday.

Intro to DSLR Photography Curriculum

Since August, my talented and wonderful coworker, Meagan Brooker, and I have been working on an Introduction to DSLR Photography curriculum. This bundle is a hefty 100 dollars, but is worth every penny. It includes 18 photography projects, 13 critiques, 9 artist research assignments, a focus on the history of photography, semester long timeline, how to set up a class blog, and more.

With this bundle you will not have to plan a single day of the semester in your photography class. If you have never picked up a DSLR camera, you will also be able to teach yourself with the step by step instructions in the lesson that teaches aperture, f-stop, ISO, manual mode and more.

Plus, in addition to all of the lessons and activities, there are also eight printable posters to decorate your classroom with examples of important photography basics. Save $25.00 on this bundle during the sale, tomorrow (2/26/19) and Wednesday (2/27/19).

Zendoodle Worksheet Bundle

Another bundle that has come together between August and now is my zendoodle worksheet pack. This pack includes nine worksheets that cover tips, techniques, and how tos with zentangling. These worksheets are a perfect introduction to adding patterns to a project or end of an assignment early finisher handout.

Each worksheet includes examples of different types of zendoodles on the front (scallops, triangles, organic, adding color, combining multiple techniques) and a space for the students to practice on the back. At $14.40 you can get it for just $10.80 on TPT the next two days.

Printable Art Supply Labels

The last product I will share with you is my most recent, my art supply labels that were posted this afternoon. I have been working on these for the last few weeks and am so excited to finally share them with you.

My students always ask where supplies are located, even though every single cabinet and drawer in my classroom is labeled. One day the light bulb went on, maybe by adding a visual students would have an easier time tracking supplies down and finding their places when they are cleaning up. After all, artists are visual people.

After making a list of every single supply I would want a label for. I got to work. I drew art supplies, painted watercolor blobs, scanned them both into my computer, and combined them together. They are bright, modern, and easy to read. I think they are perfect for K through college, readers and non-readers, and any style art classroom.

These are listed for $25.00 and you get two different style labels, in two different sizes, of 46 different art supplies. There are a ton in this pack! Tomorrow and Wednesday you can get them for just. $18.75 on TPT.

Today I have been preparing for the big TPT sale and settling back into reality. My little family and I returned home today from a brief Florida visit for a wedding. Cooper and Kennedy spent the weekend with my in-laws in Tampa while Nick and I continued on to the Florida Keys, Islamorada. Is was sunny, hot, gorgeous, and turquoise. I am not ready to be home but I am excited for tomorrow!

If you want to see some other resources I have been working on since this time last year check out my August sale blog post hereand the cyber Monday sale blog post here.

Thanks for taking them time to check out my blog! Help me spread the word about my blog, my TPT art resources, and the big sale tomorrow by sharing with others! Thanks for stopping by.

Review and Giveaway: Photobox Canvas Print (closed)

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A few weeks ago I was contacted by Roy Bainbridge, the PR Manager of a UK company Photobox, about doing a review and giveaway of their canvas print line. Photobox is an online digital photograph company, specializing in photograph based gifts. They offer a range of items, from photo albums made from your uploaded files to clothing, calendars, and stationary, to a wide range of canvas print styles and sizes. When I first began looking into the company I expected a small boutique, start up, looking for some outside-of-the-box PR opportunities. What I found was an already established company, with over 116,000 likes on their Facebook page.

After researching the company and seeing what they offer online, I couldn’t wait to partner with them and review one of their canvas prints. I quickly went to my extensive Iphoto library, and began sifting through pictures to find the perfect one to convert to a canvas print. Once I found the perfect photo, one of Nick and my engagement pictures, I created a username on Photobox, and e-mailed Roy my information. He very quickly credited my account for one Classic Canvas print, 60cm x 40.6cm (in non-metric terms a 24″ x 16″ x 1.5″) plus shipping.

Once he notified me of my credited account I couldn’t wait to get started. I logged back into Photobox, and got to work. I selected “Canvas” at the top of their website, scrolled down to “Classic Canvas”, and selected my size. I first attempted the “drag and drop” upload option to insert my picture, but it continued to give me an error message. I finally went through the traditional, “upload and select your file” option, and it worked perfectly.

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I was bummed to find out my original plan of having a wrapped image print (where the image continues on the sides of the canvas) was not an option with the image I chose. By having the sides wrap it caused the image to crop in too much, and our feet ended up wrapping around the side. I considered switching pictures all together to achieve this look, but decided I was too attached to this one to change. I reluctantly decided to have a non-wrapped image, and have since considered either framing it or painting the edges black, both which are easy to do. As you order your print keep this in mind, if you want a wrapped image make sure your original photograph is able to be cropped.

The remainder of the ordering process was a piece of cake, overall their website was very user friendly. I placed my order and eagerly awaited it’s arrival.

A week later the box finally arrived. I ripped it open and pulled out my greatly anticipated print. At first I was very excited to see our picture enlarged so much, but then I was bummed when I realized the canvas was very loose on the frame. When I looked at it at the side it had a distinct ripple affect. I immediately e-mailed Roy and explained the situation, and asked how it could be fixed. In no time at all he responded with a sincere apology, explanation, and solution.

Apparently a few recent orders of the Classic Canvas prints had calibration issues with the joint measurements, which affected the tightness. By the time he e-mailed me back he had already been in contact with customer service about the issue and re-sent my order through. If there is ever an issue with an order, the re-order is automatically sent through quality control, where it is reviewed and looked at by and actual human being (amazing!) before it is re-shipped. It’s nice to know that with such a large company they take care of their customers.

Although I was bummed that I had to wait another week for my canvas to come in, in a way I was also glad that I experienced their customer service department. This gave me a more comprehensive experience with the company, and I now feel I can give more than one perspective on my overall experience with them.

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Less than a week later my new, new canvas print showed up on my doorstep. Once again I ripped open the box and discovered my beautiful, high quality print. It still had a slight ripple in the canvas, but not nearly to the extent of the first one. After 24 hours the ripple was gone, leaving a tight, perfect print. I believe the long shipping process from the UK to the States with heat, etc. caused it to temporarily loosen. If you experience something similar with your order I suggest you wait at least 24 hours before contacting them.

All in all my experience with Photobox was a wonderful one, and I LOVE my print! I have it proudly displayed in my house and I can’t wait to pick out the perfect frame to finish it off. What I love even more about the company was their willingness to not only send me a free print, but also offer one to one of my readers. Enter below for your chance to win your very own Classic Canvas print, at whatever size you desire!!

To enter this giveaway all you have to do is:

1. Tweet about the giveaway and include a link to Photobox (http://www.photobox.co.uk/shop/wall-decor/canvas-prints)

2. A tweet is preferred  but if you don’t have a Twitter account please mention the giveaway on Facebook, and include the link: http://www.photobox.co.uk/shop/wall-decor/canvas-prints

3. Comment below and include a link to your tweet or facebook page! The winner will be randomly selected next Tuesday (6/25/13)! All tweets and likes will be checked before the winner is notified.

If you don’t win this amazing giveaway try using Photobox for your next canvas print, they are a great, reliable company and they continuously offer specials and discounts on orders! Click here to purchase your own photo canvas

Thanks for reading my review of Photobox and entering my giveaway! Help me spread the word about my blog by tweeting, liking, e-mailing, and sharing with others, I can’t do it without you! Thanks for stopping by!

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Visual Journal Page 28: A Tribute to Polaroids and Dark Rooms

One of my favorite courses in college was photography. I loved it so much because I learned how a camera and dark room work. I never knew how much you could control the image through the development process until I went through it myself.

I remember one photograph I took, it was a half dilapidated building with the sunlight shining between a pile of wooden slats. I was happy with the image, but because the sun was shining right into the camera lens, the sky was very washed out. I showed my teacher, thinking there was nothing more I could do, but she told me to go back and as I enlarge the image wave my hand over the sky to help pull out the gray tones. I thought there was no way, the camera couldn’t capture that information because the sun was too bright. However, low and behold once I followed her advice, the sky and clouds began to appear.

I was so impressed that the camera was able to capture all of that information, yet it was still up to me to find a way to bring it out. It made me appreciate photography  more as an art form, I felt like my hand and touch was in every photograph even though it was captured using a camera.

This visual journal page is a dedication to the “old” way of photography (even though it’s not that old, I’m only 25…). What first sparked this page was when I heard that polaroid film was no longer going to be manufactured. That broke my heart just a little bit. Polaroids have such a magical, immediately retro quality. I love the coloration, the tab at the bottom to write a caption… Shortly after hearing that disappointing news I was talking to a professor who told me an art college in California was shutting down their dark room, since everything is going digital. I couldn’t believe my ears. How can photography students go through photography school without understanding how film is developed? How can they appreciate what a camera does without seeing it for themselves? It’s sad to think that someone will miss out on the epiphany I had in that tiny dark room, with that spooky red glow, and the smell of chemicals swirling around me.

I am dying to teach photography, to have the chance to show students how amazing a camera is, and how amazing it feels to see the image slowly develop in the vats of chemicals. I remember dropping my pictures in the developer, hovering over it, waiting to see the image appear. Nothing is more satisfying and exciting than seeing the grays and blacks beginning to transition into a photograph. One day when I get my dark room up and running I will try my hardest to always have it going. Yes, I will teach digital photography, it is where photography is today, you can do amazing things with it. But you have to look to the past in order to move forward in the future.

This visual journal page was inspired by the image of the girl with the Polaroid, I found it in a magazine and decided I needed to make a page about photography. I kept an eye open for something to go with it, it didn’t look complete with just the Polaroid image. Finally I came across the red spiral. The red and black reminded me of the way images look in the dark room, with the red safe light on. I loved the random images, it tied in with the idea of a Polaroid picture, a spontaneous moment, person, or thing. I carefully cut out the spiral, glued the Polaroid image down, and glued the spiral on top. Since photographs often focus on images rather than words, I decided to leave this without words, as a tribute to photography.

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