Tag: glass plate

Arts and Craft Fair: Whimsical Wares in Marietta, GA

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It is time for art and craft fair number two, at the annual Whimsical Wares show in Marietta, GA. Over the summer, Debbie, one of the co-founders of the show, reached out to me about including me in their 18th Whimsical Ware show. I loved her enthusiasm, the setup sounded easy, and a portion of the sales is donated to CURE Childhood Cancer. How could I say no.

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I quickly decided I would commit to the show, and began putting together a variety of fused glass and encaustic pieces to display. Despite being sandwiched between two shows I was already committed to, I decided I could make this fit into my schedule as well. One of the main reasons I was able to commit, was because of the low commitment required of the artists. I am excited to attend the artist meet and greet on Thursday 11/14/14, from 6-9, but am glad Debbie, Helaine, and other volunteers are taking care of the rest.

marist craft fair

This past Sunday, I set up my items, and headed home. The show opens today 11/12/14 (from 9-5) and runs through Sunday 11/16/14. I am not required to be present for any part of it, and in return, they get a percentage of all sales. It gave me time to prep for my next show, at St. Pius X Holiday Marketplace on 11/22/14, and regain some energy after a very busy beginning of the month. Last weekend was spent at the Marist Holiday Traditions festival, which was a huge success. However, I am in need of a weekend at home, and am thrilled I can participate in another event, while being able to do that.

Whimsical Wares Artwork

I have a wide variety of items, and prices, at the Whimsical Wares festival. I have fused glass plates, bowls, and slumped bottles that range in price from $8.00-$48.00. I also have mixed media, encaustic paintings that range in price from $50.00-$650.00. One of the newer items have I begun offering are matted prints of my mixed media, encaustic letters, at only $15.00 each.

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I have enjoyed putting together all of my fused glass pieces. I have nest designs on bright colored backgrounds, birch tree plates, and geometric designs. I am also in love with the slumped, antique coke bottles, which are perfect for spoon rests.

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My 6″x6″ encaustic paintings were one of the most popular items at the Marist Holiday Traditions show. I love seeing people connect with the different imagery, tying a memory or special moment to the various objects.

IMG_1791My backyard chickens are an endless source of inspiration for my artwork, and I can’t seem to keep my chicken paintings in stock. These are the latest chicken themed paintings I have completed. Real chicken feathers are encased in layers of wax, with oil painted chickens on top. These both measure 12″x12″.

Whimsical Wares House

The Whimsical Wares show is currently open in an adorable retail space at the intersection of Johnson Ferry Road and Paper Mill Road, in Marietta, GA. Check it out, take care of some holiday shopping, and help CURE Childhood Cancer buy making a purchase.

Thanks for taking the time to read about all of my November festivals. Help me spread the word about my blog by sharing with others. I couldn’t do it without you. Don’t forget to check out my latest giveaway it ends Thursday, 11/13/14 at midnight. Thanks for stopping by!

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Wesleyan Artist Market

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I am excited to announce that I will be involved in the Wesleyan Artist Market this year! I will be sharing a booth with one of my coworkers, and hopefully selling some artwork. If you live in the area (Norcross, GA) please stop by and support local artists! The market will have over 80 artists selling work, in a range of materials from jewelry to oil paintings. The market will be open to the public Thursday May 2nd (7-9pm), Friday May 3rd (9am-7pm), and Saturday May 4th (10am-4pm).

This is my very first craft fair, if all goes well I may look into joining the Atlanta craft circuit in hopes of selling more of my artwork. At my booth I will have my fused glass pieces and mixed media artwork for sale. I will have a range of sizes, subject matter and prices. My mixed media pieces range from $15-$550.  I hope to see you there!

Pieces for sale:

Fused Glass-Geometric Blue and Green Plate

Fused Glass-Small Square Geometric Bowl

Fused Glass- Geometric Pattern Round Plate

12"x24" encaustic mixed media
12″x24″ encaustic mixed media

W and N Letters

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March and April Giveaway: Fused Glass Plate and Spoon Rest (closed)

Fused Glass- Small Bowl Shots

Fused Glass-Spoon Rest Shots

Thank you to everyone for participating in this month’s giveaway! I am waiting to confirm with the winners, if they don’t confirm in the next 24 hours, new ones will be selected. Keep checking back for my May giveaway in the next few weeks!

This month’s giveaway covers the months of March and April, which means you have two chances to win! The first giveaway this month is a small fused glass blue, yellow and gray plate. The small size makes this piece very versatile, it could be a cute decorative addition to a side table, a way to spruce up a candle, or a shallow dish for dips and candy! The second prize is a blue and gray asymmetrical bowl. This piece could serve as a spoon rest, candy dish, or decorative addition to your house.

Both of these prizes were personally made by me. I recently discovered how to fuse glass, and I am falling in love with the process. Every piece I personally pick out colors, plan the design, cut the glass to size, fuse the pieces together, and slump them in my kiln. I have also recently added a glassware section to my Etsy shop in hopes that I can fund my new love with glass sales!

To enter this competition all you have to do is complete three easy steps. You are only eligible to win one item, two winners will be selected.

1. Visit my Etsy shop here and like my shop or your favorite item!

2. Like my Facebook page here

3. Comment on this post with which piece you would like to win and what you liked on my shop (I can’t guarantee you will get your first choice, the first person drawn will get their first choice)

Good luck, I can’t wait to find out who are the lucky winners this month! Each winner is randomly drawn using the “And the Winner is” plugin. The winners will be drawn and announced Thursday, May 2nd. Thanks for visiting my blog and participating in my giveaway! Help me spread the word about my blog by liking, tweeting, sharing, commenting, and subscribing! Thanks for stopping by!

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Art Lesson: Fused Glass

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I recently did my first glass fusing art lesson with my high school 3D II students, and they loved it! Only halfway through the first day of fusing almost everyone of my students had proclaimed this as their favorite project. It’s easy, fun, and almost fool proof. Even my students who quickly rushed through, and didn’t really consider the design had a good turn out. I am now starting this with my 3D I student and can’t wait to see what they produce! First off I aplogize for the terrible photographs. They were already set up for our annual art show when I realized I hadn’t gotten pictures yet. They will be replaced with better ones once the show comes down! In this post you will find the necessary supplies, approximate cost, and how to to do this with your own students!

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SUPPLIES:

  • A digital kiln: They do make glass kilns but I converted one of my ceramic kilns to glass only. It is a programable Skutt kiln. By entering “ramp and hold” information I am able to achieve the same results as I would in a glass kiln!
  • Glass glove: Not necessary but a number of my students left class with sliced fingers, and the majority of them were using the gloves by the end of the project
  • Grozer: Glass scorer for organic shapes
  • Glass pliers: For breaking
  • Glass breaker: I found a cheap pink one that works great!
  • Cutting system: I bought a kit that included a waffle grid, Flying Beetle cutter, and a Beetle bit cutter
  • Kiln wash or spray: I use the spray and it is more expensive but you don’t have to set the wash before you fire on it, it’s very easy!
  • Kiln wash sheets: I place these thin sheets on top of my ceramic kiln shelves, each one lasts a few firings, and they cost $5 per sheet, so this adds up.
  • Adhesive, heat gun, bail bonds: This is if you want to do jewelry pieces and pendants
  • Molds: I have a variety of plate and bowl molds, my most popular are my 7″ sqaure bowl and jumping bean mini bowl, I plan to purchase a few of these in the future.
  • 96 COE glass: You must purchase glass with the same COE, 96 is the easiest to work with
  • 96 COE frit: Ground up glass into a sand like substance
  • Noodles and stringers: Long, thin pieces of glass

APPROXIMATE COST: $600.00

HOW TO:

For the assignment I began with a powerpoint explaining the process, what glass fusing is, how it’s done, and what our assignment is. I left the requirements very loose, each student had to create one plate or bowl, using a clear sheet of glass as a base, and add color pieces on top to create their design. I am glad it was open ended because it gave them the chance to push themselves to come up with an interesting design. Once I completed the powerpoint I demonstrated how to use the tools and went over a few tips when working with glass:

  • Glass wants to be 1/4 of an inch thick. If you fire one sheet of glass, without adding to it, it will shrink in order to get to a 1/4″ thick. If you stack two layer of glass it will stay about the same thickness, if you stack more than two it will spread to 1/4″ thick. If you put two layers in one area, and leave another area just one layer, you may end up with an uneven edge because of the shrinking and spreading. 
  • You can’t stack more than three sheets of glass together, I recommended they stick with just two layers.
  • When you layer glass together you run the risk of trapping air pockets
  • If you fire the sheet of clear under the color cut pieces the cut pieces may end up with more rounded edges. If you fire the clear glaze on top it prevents the cut pieces from spreading as much, and you get much cleaner lines

Once they understood the assignment and process they began working on their sketches. They were required to create at least three, and they had to be full color. I wanted them to consider the color and placement of the pieces before they began cutting to reduce the amount of wasted glass. After I approved their design they got to work.

They began by measuring the mold they wanted to use, and drawing it on a sheet of clear using sharpie. This was done at their seat to reduce the amount of traffic at the cutting station. Once they were ready to cut, they moved to the cutting station, made their cuts, breaks, then took it back to their seat. Once their base was cut we used hand sanitizer to remove the sharpie lines. I believe any alcohol based cleaning product will work, I just happened to have hand sanitizer, and it reduced the amount of germs floating around in the room.

After their base was cut they began cutting the color pieces and creating their designs. After each piece was cut they used a couple dots of Elmer’s glue to stick the color piece to the clear glass base. You only want to use enough to keep the glass from sliding when you place it in the kiln. If you use too much it will char in the firing and leave a gray mark. Rather than measuring the space the color piece was meant to go, and then marking the piece based on the ruler, I had my student set the color sheets on their mold and mark where the edges needed to hit. This helped reduce the number of wrong cuts and mis-measuring.

Once their design was complete we placed them in the kiln and full fused them. You can only put one shelf layer of glass in at a time, you can’t stack shelves like you can with ceramics, so this process can take longer if you have to do multiple firings. After they were full fused we placed them in the molds and slumped them!
Art Lesson- Fused Glass Sushi Plates

I have a Skutt electric ceramic kiln, and in order to fire glass I use the “ramp/hold” option on my kiln. The following are firing schedules I currently use, and have had success with. To program them into my kiln I press “ramp/hold” enter the number of segments, hit enter, and enter the rest of the data (temperature rise per hour, goal temp, hold time, for each segment). I then hit “review”, it runs through my program, and at the end I hit the “on” button, it’s very easy!

Tack fuse (glass will have a raised texture)

5 segments (or ramps)

Ramp 1: 400/HR, 1100 degrees, HOLD 5 minutes

Ramp 2: 75/HR, 1250 degrees, HOLD 5 minutes

Ramp 3: 9999 (as fast as possible), 1380 degrees, HOLD 10 minutes

Ramp 4: 9999, 950 degrees, HOLD 10 monutes

Ramp 5: 100 HR, 800 degrees, 0 HOLD

 

Full fuse (glass will be smooth)

5 segments (or ramps)

Ramp 1: 400/HR, 1100 degrees, HOLD 5 minutes

Ramp 2: 75/HR, 1250 degrees, HOLD 5 minutes

Ramp 3: 9999 (as fast as possible), 1450 degrees, HOLD 10 minutes

Ramp 4: 9999, 950 degrees, HOLD 10 monutes

Ramp 5: 100 HR, 800 degrees, 0 HOLD

 

Slump (Glass is just warm enough to take the form of your mold)

6 segments (or ramps)

Ramp 1: 150/HR, 300 degrees, HOLD 15 minutes

Ramp 2: 300/HR, 1100 degrees, HOLD 20 minutes

Ramp 3: 150/HR, 1250 degrees, HOLD 25 minutes

Ramp 4: 400, 950 degrees, HOLD 60 monutes

Ramp 5: 150 HR, 800 degrees, HOLD 10 minutes

Ramp 6: 300/HR, 100 degrees, 0 HOLD

I hope you enjoyed today’s post, and I hope you can use these tips if you are looking to try glass fusing in your classroom. Feel free to comment or email me with questions, concerns, or thoughts in general. Thanks for stopping by!