Month: April 2014

Craft Fair: 16th Annual Wesleyan Artist Market

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It’s the week I have been preparing for, for the last few months, it is Artist Market week!

I’m so lucky to work at a school that offers opportunities to promote my artwork, like the Wesleyan Artist Market. Last year I felt very accomplished as I packed up my booth, a good 30 pieces shy of what I came in with. I hope to be just as successful as I was last year, and since then I have added a lot to my inventory.

Here is a sneak peak of what I will be offering this year. Prices range from $5.00-$750.oo, offering a lot of options for all size and depths of wallets. With Mother’s Day rapidly approaching, and Father’s Day in the not too distant future, this market is a great opportunity to pick up gifts and plan ahead. Support local and handmade and come visit!

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Last year my biggest seller were my encaustic letter paintings. A collage of pattern paper, a layer of encaustic wax, and an oil painted letter come together to create these personalized works of art. Unfortunately, due to time constraints I was limited on how many letters I was able to bring in. On the first night all my vowels sold, which meant I could no longer display cleverly spelled out words.

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This year I started letter painting in advanced, and have the entire alphabet created. In addition, I have also scanned every single letter I made, and had high quality prints made. The prints are the same size as the original, 6″x6″, and are matted in either 8″x10″ or 8″x8″. I hope these prints will help meet the demand for the letters. The $10.00 price per letter will also allow people to more easily buy a few, spell out words, or hang an initial for each member of their family. These prints will also make an appearance on my Etsy shop soon!

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In addition to the re-appearance of my letter paintings, I also have my 6″x6″ silhouette paintings, at $35.00 each. These were my second biggest sellers, and I hope the range of images I have picked will appeal to the crowd once again. I love to focus on old and vintage in these pieces. The encaustic wax inherently creates a hazy, dreamlike surface to my paintings, and the vintage items pair well with the wax.

Antique Photo Collages

A new item I am offering this year are my re-purposed antique photographs. While at an estate sale I discovered an entire table full of 1920’s photographs. Something about the antique cars and stiff looking portraits appealed to me, and I decided to use them as part of a new encaustic series.

To create these pieces I layer paper, the photograph, and add a thick layer of wax on top. The hazy wax blends the layers of photographs and paper together, creating a cohesive look. In the future I envision the original photographs hanging next to silhouette transfers of the originals, with bright colors popping behind them. It will be a comparison of old and new, breathing new life into old photos. Be on the look out for these in the future!

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I will also have larger encaustic paintings, a few from last year and a few new ones. The new encaustic pieces I am working on focus on sketching. Lines are carved into the wax, and filled with oil paint. These range in subject matter from chickens to chairs, and range in price from $250.00 to $450.00.

Birch Tree Encaustics

In addition to my sketch encaustics I also have antique silverware paintings, ginkgo leaf collages, and lots of birch trees!

Fused Glass

Like last year I will once again put out a handful of my fused glass pieces. I have my traditional geometric style as well as my new pieces, which incorporate my new obsession, glass paint. I have nest and birch tree themed plates and bowls using the paint to add the details. Whatever doesn’t sell this weekend will make its way to my Etsy shop, Sweet Celadon.

I hope to see a nice crowd this weekend, I hope you stop by! Thanks for checking out my blog, help me spread the word by sharing with others! Check out the line up of entertainment and food trucks at the Artist Market here.

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Mixed Media Vs. Multimedia : Making A Distinction by Alison Lansky

 

 

There are so many different styles of art that it is easy to get some of them confused with others, especially if they have similar names. One area where there seems to be a great deal of confusion is in distinguishing between mixed media art and multimedia art. They do sound similar and it is common for people to assume that these terms both refer to the same type of artwork. However, there are some very clear distinctions that set these apart. When you understand these distinctions it becomes clear that the two are actually very different!

What Is Mixed Media Art?

Mixed media art is a type of visual art which incorporates various different types of art media. For example, a canvas which combines paint, ink and collage techniques could be considered to be mixed media artwork. Similarly, a sculpture constructed from clay with other materials embedded would also be considered mixed media. In short, mixed media is artwork which uses more than one medium in its creation. The image below shows Kyle Boganwright’s ‘Whale’ which is a good example of mixed media art as it incorporates pen, ink and watercolor paint in its composition. If you are looking for more examples of mixed media art, then you can look out for books about the topic. There is a great selection available from www.jacksonsart.com including ‘Exhibition 36: A Gallery of Mixed Media Inspiration’ by Susan Tuttle which is a personal favorite of mine.

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What Is Multimedia Art?

On the other hand, multimedia artwork covers a far broader spectrum. Often the term relates to art installations which combine both audio and visual components. This might include merging drama, dance, film, graphics, music and even interactive elements.

Often multimedia art galleries will display artwork with lighting and sound incorporated in the display to give viewers the complete multi-sensory effect.

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Key Differences Between Mixed Media & Multimedia

In order to separate these two postmodern art forms, the key difference is that mixed media art covers all forms of visual art (sculpture, painting, drawing etc.) which incorporates two or more mediums. This is often done by layering materials to create more interesting textures. However, multimedia not only incorporates these visual arts, but also additional audio visual elements and also other arts such as literature, drama and dance. Multimedia is by its very definition the broader of the two while mixed media art has more limitation.

Examples of Mixed Media Art

Once you understand what mixed media art actually is you may start to notice many different examples of it in everyday life. Like all art, it is all about freedom to express yourself so examples of mixed media art are varied. Some of the common examples that you may have noticed include some greeting cards which are often created using scrapbooking techniques where the main painted or drawn image is embellished with other materials such as glitter, ribbons and other types of decoration.

Another popular form of mixed media artwork is the artist trading card (ATC). These small 2.5 inch by 3.5 inch cards art not exclusively mixed media, but it is a popular technique which many artists use to create tiny pieces of art which are swapped or traded with other artists.

In conclusion, the easiest way to tell the difference between mixed media and multimedia is to keep in mind that mixed media art will combine two or more forms of visual art whereas multimedia art will combine visual art with audio visual elements and even elements of other art forms includings literature, drama and dance.

 

–Alison Lansky is a mother of two great kids and loves to blog on a variety of topics which catch her interest including art, parenting and family.

A big thank you to Alison for sending me this interesting and informative article. I would also like to extend a big thank you to you, for checking out my blog. Help me spread the word by sharing it with others, thanks for stopping by!

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“Whale” image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/kylebgalleries/4317292826/in/photolist-7zvfKd-bfZGXM-9A258y

Multimedia image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeremyschulz/2897028170

Craft Fair: 2014 Wesleyan Artist Market

wesleyan   The 16th annual Wesleyan Artist Market is coming up next week, May 1st-May 3rd!

I’m incredibly excited to be involved in this wonderful program again this year. I am blessed to work at an amazing school and have opportunities like the Artist Market. Not only will I have the space to display and sell my work, but the 25% they take from the total sales goes back into the Fine Arts department at my school. In my two short years working at Wesleyan School I have already had glass supplies, plants and picnics tables for a garden outside of my classroom, and a brand new outdoor kiln funded by the Artist Market.

Last year I sold over 30 items, and I hope to be just as successful this year. At my booth I will have a variety of size and priced encaustics, including letter and silhouette encaustics, and fused glass, similar to my offerings last year. In addition, I will be introducing new items, from my “sketch” series (the boat painting below is one in the series), and letter prints for just $10 apiece.

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Be on the look out for another post next week detailing the items I will have for sale.

If you live in the Atlanta area clear out your schedule and check out the Artist Market, located at Wesleyan School: 5405 Spalding Drive Norcross, GA 30092. Festivities will be held in Yancey Gymnasium. This year there will be over 90 artist booths, refreshments, entertainment, and activities for children (the children’s market is Saturday morning). Read more on the flyer below! Thanks for checking out my blog, I hope to see you at this year’s Artist Market! Help me spread the word by sharing with others. Thanks for stopping by! [subscribe2] xlg-artist_market_2

Handmade Ceramics: Alphabet Mugs, Nursery Rhyme Teapots, and Flower Bowls


Alphabet Coffee Mugs

These last few weeks have been a blur of late afternoons, clay, pottery wheels, handmade ceramic pieces, glaze, encaustic wax, and glass.

My recent decision to join the newest addition to the Atlanta retail scene, Crafted Westside, meant I needed to produce pottery. My long afternoons began, my second job as working artist started as soon as my first job, art teacher, ended for the day. Every day I stay pumping out decorative bowls, teapots, pitchers, and mugs. I love seeing the similar glaze colors coating each pot create a unified, body of work.

I don’t think I have ever made so much pottery.

As I begin each creation I try to think like a consumer. Who will buy my products? What is their taste? What will compliment the overall look of the shop? Generally the consumer I visualize is me, shopping for my Mom on Mother’s Day, my sister for Christmas. When it came time to create my “c” alphabet mug, I couldn’t help but include a coral shade, after all my sister Christy is a bright, pink personality.

My goal in the coming weeks is to complete the entire alphabet in mug form. I am currently up to letter m, with letters n-u waiting to be fired and glazed, and letters v-z waiting to come into reality via my B mix clay and pottery wheel. If you want to order your own customizable alphabet mug, check out my Etsy shop, Sweet Celadon, here. I also hope to add a few more “cup of joe” mugs to the mix.

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In addition to the many mugs I have created in the past few weeks, I have also been hard at work creating more decorative bowls. My house is scattered with ceramic bowls. If a tabletop looks empty, I plop a bowl down to jazz it up. I love crisp white contrasting with a bright interior. Over the years I have developed a knack for making flowers out of clay. A pinch here, a pinch there, a score and a slip, and out comes a hydrangea, rose, or camellia. Just this week I added a dot bowl and a hydrangea to the mix at Crafted Westside.

Dot Bowl

Hydrangea Bowl

My absolute favorite thing to make on the pottery wheel has to be teapots. There is something about seeing the spout, lid, and handle come together that makes me smile.

Teapots

I knew I wanted to add a couple of teapots to the shelves of Crafted. Luckily, at the time I was also about to begin a teapot lesson in my 3D II class. It was the perfect opportunity to kill two birds with one stone; demonstrate how to make a teapot to my students, and create a teapot I could turn around and sell.

First came my bird teapot. I want to create a small bird to serve as the handle of my teapot lid. After some brainstorming I decided to go a more abstract route when glazing, and drew lines to represent telephone lines, and glazed in between the lines. The end result almost looked like a plaid shirt wrapped around my little teapot. When you first take a glance at it, it looks like a random pattern. But, when you give it a closer look the telephone lines and bird silhouette begin to emerge.

For the second teapot I opted to stick with a stamped letter design, which was already incorporated into a handful of mugs and bowls at the shop.  I put my teapot together, and thought about what to stamp into it. After looking at my small little pot, I decided the perfect quote is from the childhood song, “I’m a little teapot, short and stout.” It was perfect, it was nostalgic, and fit with the short and stout nature of my teapot.

There is something about teapots. They each have their own personality. As I put them together I feel like I get to know them.

The final addition to my space at Crafted Westside is my brand new business card holder. With the creation of my new identity, Sweet Celadon, came a need for advertisement and contact information in the form of business cards. While I waited for my order to arrive I decided I needed a handmade ceramic item to hold my new cards. Out came this simple, flower and hand stamped card holder.

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I can’t wait to see my table at Crafted Westside continue to fill up. I hope in the coming weeks I continue to move items through the door and create new items to replace them. In addition to the handmade ceramics I have focused on for the shop, I have also been prepping for my next craft fair, the annual Wesleyan Artist Market, coming up May 1st-3rd. More information will come soon!

Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog! Help me spread the word about the brand new shop, Crafted Westside, and my blog my sharing this post with others. Check out my Etsy shops here and here and Crafted’s website here. Also check out more pictures of my latest ceramic pieces below. Thanks for stopping by!

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Visual Journal Page 64: Finding Green

Visual-Journal-Page-64-Finding-Green I’m a little embarrassed to admit it, after all I am an artist, but I am terrible at picking wall colors.

I love going to the paint aisle of hardware stores. It’s all metal, wood, industrial, until you hit the paint section. Suddenly bright colors, nice aesthetics, a more feminine side of a typically masculine place appear. I always have a very specific color in mind when shopping for my home projects.

For the kitchen I wanted green, but not just any green, a nice bright, bold green. I walked over to the green paint samples, and one immediately caught my eye. It was bright,  bold, a beautiful grass green. I tried looking for other colors, various shades, anything else that struck me like this green. But, I was too distracted by my initial gut feeling. This had to be it, this had to be the perfect color.

Another issue I have is my impatience. I want things and I want them now. I want to start a project, and it needs to be done ASAP. When you combine this with an inability to choose wall paint, you end up with a money deficiency and an excess of paint. This day was no different. I decided since I had such a gut feeling about this green, I should go ahead and buy it. That way I could head straight home, get to painting, finish this project, and still have a relaxing Sunday to look forward to.

I headed home, got out my brushes and drop cloth, and got to work. The first brushstroke I felt good. I kept visualizing my bold kitchen. I played entire conversations in my head about guests coming over, complimenting our kitchen, wishing they were as bold as I was because it looked so good. Suddenly my kitchen was gracing the covers of home improvement magazines, Better Homes and GardensGood Housekeeping, Southern Living, they all wanted a piece of my beautiful, grass green kitchen.

By the time my daydreams had worked their way through my brain, the wall around one of my kitchen windows was complete. I stepped back to admire my work, and the flutter of excitement gave way to the “uh oh… I think I made a mistake.” All I could think was lego. It was bold alright, it look plastic, childish, and so very green. I refused to give up on my color, and waited until Nick came home and hoped he would see something different than I did. He was shaking his head before he even made it into the kitchen.

This green was not going to last. I was once again off to the hardware store, with a little less pep in my step, and a little less confidence in my color taste. I went back three more times trying to find my perfect green. Every time a new shade went on the wall my confidence took another hit. I couldn’t get it right. My one day project suddenly stretched a week. Our neutral and slightly boring kitchen had transformed into a disaster. Four different shades of green splattered the walls, not one of them looked good.

When I look at a paint tester I see a small section of color. I fall in love with the bright shades. What I can’t get past is visualizing that small 1″x1″ square as an entire room. Once you have a wall painted the color transforms. Bright and beautiful turns overwhelming.

Finally, Nick had to step in. Together we went to the paint store. He walked right up to the greens I had visits so many times and grabbed a color. “Recycled Glass”, a lovely, light shade of green. I wasn’t convinced, but after four attempts of my own, it was Nick’s turn to give it a go. We bought our gallon, went home, and I once again started to paint.

I hated to admit it, but it was perfect. The light shade on a large scale was bright, bold, but not too bold. It was the green I was searching for. I still have not regained confidence in my wall color selecting ability. Another disaster trying to paint my front door blue certainly didn’t help. For the foreseeable future Nick will have to be by my side, giving his two cents when it comes to paint colors.

SUPPLIES

  • Visual journal
  • Rubber cement
  • Pencil
  • Colored pencils
  • Wall paint
  • Sharpie

HOW TO

To create this visual journal page I decided to recreate my kitchen in my book. I knew I wanted to use the actual failed wall paints, so I opted to tear two pages from my book, paint them, then glue them back in. This prevents wet materials, like paint, from seeping through multiple pages.

After ripping out my two pages I draw out the corner of my kitchen using pencil. I wanted the outdoor area to stand out through the window, so I decided to color it in using colored pencils. For the interior space I used watered down white paint for the molding and lightly colored with colored pencils for the floor. I then opened up my many cans of wall paint and added a touch of each green to my drawn walls.

Once they dried I added words with sharpie and glued them back into my book using rubber cement.

I am terrible at choosing wall colors… and I am self conscious about it… because I’m an artist… and I should be good at it.

CHALLENGE

Create a visual journal page about something you wish you were good at.

Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog! Help spread the word by sharing with others, I couldn’t do it without you. Thanks for stopping by!

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